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Postprandial lipoprotein, glucose and insulin responses after two consecutive meals containing rapeseed oil, sunflower oil or palm oil with or without glucose at the first meal.
Br J Nutr 1999; 82(2):97-104BJ

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that the degree of postprandial lipaemia may be of importance in the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Postprandial lipid, lipoprotein, glucose, insulin and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were investigated in eleven healthy young males after randomized ingestion of meals containing rapeseed oil, sunflower oil or palm oil with or without a glucose drink. On six occasions each subject consumed consecutive meals (separated by 1.75 h) containing 70 g (15 g and 55 g respectively) of each oil. On one occasion with each oil 50 g glucose was taken with the first meal. One fasting and fifteen postprandial blood samples were taken over 9 h. There were no statistically significant differences in lipoprotein and apolipoprotein responses after rapeseed, sunflower and palm oils, whereas insulin responses were lower after sunflower oil than after rapeseed oil (ANOVA, P = 0.04). The NEFA and triacylglycerol concentrations at 1.5 h were reduced when 50 g glucose was taken with the first meal (ANOVA, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05 respectively), regardless of meal fatty acid composition. In conclusion, the consumption of glucose with a mixed meal containing either rapeseed, sunflower or palm oil influenced the immediate triacylglycerol and NEFA responses compared with the same meal without glucose, whereas no significant effect on postprandial lipaemia after a subsequent meal was observed. The fatty acid composition of the meal did not significantly affect the lipid and lipoprotein responses, whereas an effect on insulin responses was observed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark. anp@kvl.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10743481

Citation

Pedersen, A, et al. "Postprandial Lipoprotein, Glucose and Insulin Responses After Two Consecutive Meals Containing Rapeseed Oil, Sunflower Oil or Palm Oil With or Without Glucose at the First Meal." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 82, no. 2, 1999, pp. 97-104.
Pedersen A, Marckmann P, Sandström B. Postprandial lipoprotein, glucose and insulin responses after two consecutive meals containing rapeseed oil, sunflower oil or palm oil with or without glucose at the first meal. Br J Nutr. 1999;82(2):97-104.
Pedersen, A., Marckmann, P., & Sandström, B. (1999). Postprandial lipoprotein, glucose and insulin responses after two consecutive meals containing rapeseed oil, sunflower oil or palm oil with or without glucose at the first meal. The British Journal of Nutrition, 82(2), pp. 97-104.
Pedersen A, Marckmann P, Sandström B. Postprandial Lipoprotein, Glucose and Insulin Responses After Two Consecutive Meals Containing Rapeseed Oil, Sunflower Oil or Palm Oil With or Without Glucose at the First Meal. Br J Nutr. 1999;82(2):97-104. PubMed PMID: 10743481.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postprandial lipoprotein, glucose and insulin responses after two consecutive meals containing rapeseed oil, sunflower oil or palm oil with or without glucose at the first meal. AU - Pedersen,A, AU - Marckmann,P, AU - Sandström,B, PY - 2000/4/1/pubmed PY - 2000/4/15/medline PY - 2000/4/1/entrez SP - 97 EP - 104 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 82 IS - 2 N2 - There is increasing evidence that the degree of postprandial lipaemia may be of importance in the development of atherosclerosis and IHD. Postprandial lipid, lipoprotein, glucose, insulin and non-esterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were investigated in eleven healthy young males after randomized ingestion of meals containing rapeseed oil, sunflower oil or palm oil with or without a glucose drink. On six occasions each subject consumed consecutive meals (separated by 1.75 h) containing 70 g (15 g and 55 g respectively) of each oil. On one occasion with each oil 50 g glucose was taken with the first meal. One fasting and fifteen postprandial blood samples were taken over 9 h. There were no statistically significant differences in lipoprotein and apolipoprotein responses after rapeseed, sunflower and palm oils, whereas insulin responses were lower after sunflower oil than after rapeseed oil (ANOVA, P = 0.04). The NEFA and triacylglycerol concentrations at 1.5 h were reduced when 50 g glucose was taken with the first meal (ANOVA, P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05 respectively), regardless of meal fatty acid composition. In conclusion, the consumption of glucose with a mixed meal containing either rapeseed, sunflower or palm oil influenced the immediate triacylglycerol and NEFA responses compared with the same meal without glucose, whereas no significant effect on postprandial lipaemia after a subsequent meal was observed. The fatty acid composition of the meal did not significantly affect the lipid and lipoprotein responses, whereas an effect on insulin responses was observed. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10743481/Postprandial_lipoprotein_glucose_and_insulin_responses_after_two_consecutive_meals_containing_rapeseed_oil_sunflower_oil_or_palm_oil_with_or_without_glucose_at_the_first_meal_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114599001245/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -