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Are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors the best treatment for hypertension in type 2 diabetes?
Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2000 Mar; 9(2):173-9.CO

Abstract

The influence of hypertension on the clinical course and complications of type 2 diabetes is well established. With a special focus on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, this paper will review recently published results of prospective studies addressing two important aspects: the degree of blood pressure control, and the choice of antihypertensive regimen, in the prevention of complications in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients. None of the recent studies have shown worse outcomes in patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-based regimens compared with alternative treatments. Some studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-based antihypertensive regimens may be superior to alternative treatments in reducing the risk of micro- and macrovascular complications, whereas other studies found similar effects for beta-blockers or calcium antagonists. Several trials showed beneficial effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors over calcium antagonists, and have raised concerns about the use of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists in these patients. However, it remains to be determined whether there should be more reserved use of calcium antagonists in such patients, in the light of more major trials showing the safety and efficacy of calcium antagonists in preventing cardiovascular and renal endpoints. The degree of reduction of blood pressure rather than the choice of a particular drug may be the most important factor. Studies focusing on renal endpoints suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have a better antiproteinuric effect than other agents, but this phenomenon is not always reflected by a more beneficial effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on the decline in glomerular filtration rate. In many ways, the question of whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are the best class of agent in these patients is academic. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are sufficiently safe, and, according to recent evidence, equally or more effective than other classes of agents. Tight blood pressure control is usually achievable only with a combination of agents. On the basis of available evidence, it appears that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, together with a low-dose cardioselective beta-blocker and a diuretic, should be used in most hypertensive type 2 diabetes patients, with calcium antagonists serving as reserve drugs in case of insufficient blood pressure control.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland 97201-2940, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10757223

Citation

Komers, R, and S Anderson. "Are Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitors the Best Treatment for Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetes?" Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension, vol. 9, no. 2, 2000, pp. 173-9.
Komers R, Anderson S. Are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors the best treatment for hypertension in type 2 diabetes? Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2000;9(2):173-9.
Komers, R., & Anderson, S. (2000). Are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors the best treatment for hypertension in type 2 diabetes? Current Opinion in Nephrology and Hypertension, 9(2), 173-9.
Komers R, Anderson S. Are Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitors the Best Treatment for Hypertension in Type 2 Diabetes. Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2000;9(2):173-9. PubMed PMID: 10757223.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors the best treatment for hypertension in type 2 diabetes? AU - Komers,R, AU - Anderson,S, PY - 2000/4/11/pubmed PY - 2000/6/8/medline PY - 2000/4/11/entrez SP - 173 EP - 9 JF - Current opinion in nephrology and hypertension JO - Curr. Opin. Nephrol. Hypertens. VL - 9 IS - 2 N2 - The influence of hypertension on the clinical course and complications of type 2 diabetes is well established. With a special focus on angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, this paper will review recently published results of prospective studies addressing two important aspects: the degree of blood pressure control, and the choice of antihypertensive regimen, in the prevention of complications in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients. None of the recent studies have shown worse outcomes in patients treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-based regimens compared with alternative treatments. Some studies have suggested that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-based antihypertensive regimens may be superior to alternative treatments in reducing the risk of micro- and macrovascular complications, whereas other studies found similar effects for beta-blockers or calcium antagonists. Several trials showed beneficial effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors over calcium antagonists, and have raised concerns about the use of dihydropyridine calcium antagonists in these patients. However, it remains to be determined whether there should be more reserved use of calcium antagonists in such patients, in the light of more major trials showing the safety and efficacy of calcium antagonists in preventing cardiovascular and renal endpoints. The degree of reduction of blood pressure rather than the choice of a particular drug may be the most important factor. Studies focusing on renal endpoints suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have a better antiproteinuric effect than other agents, but this phenomenon is not always reflected by a more beneficial effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors on the decline in glomerular filtration rate. In many ways, the question of whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are the best class of agent in these patients is academic. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors are sufficiently safe, and, according to recent evidence, equally or more effective than other classes of agents. Tight blood pressure control is usually achievable only with a combination of agents. On the basis of available evidence, it appears that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, together with a low-dose cardioselective beta-blocker and a diuretic, should be used in most hypertensive type 2 diabetes patients, with calcium antagonists serving as reserve drugs in case of insufficient blood pressure control. SN - 1062-4821 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10757223/Are_angiotensin_converting_enzyme_inhibitors_the_best_treatment_for_hypertension_in_type_2_diabetes L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/00041552-200003000-00012 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -