Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association of dietary elements and lower urinary tract symptoms.
Scand J Urol Nephrol 2000; 34(1):46-50SJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the study was to establish whether dietary elements are related to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and thus to diseases causing LUTS.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

This population-based study was carried out in 1994; a questionnaire was mailed to all men born in 1924, 1934 or 1944 living in Tampere or 11 rural or semi-rural municipalities in the same county, altogether 3143 men. Of this population, 68% were ultimately included in the study. A modified version of the DAN-PSS-1 questionnaire (10 of the questions) was used to assess urinary symptoms and problems arising from them. A symptom index was formed by multiplying the symptom and problem scores for hesitancy, incomplete emptying, urge, urge incontinence, nocturia and daytime frequency, and totalling the products. The men were also asked to report on their medical history, how often they ate vegetables and meat, whether they used butter, margarine or vegetable oil in food, how much alcohol and coffee they consumed, their smoking history and their weight and height. The risk of LUTS was estimated according to the frequency of meat and vegetable intake and the kind of fat used.

RESULTS

The confounder-adjusted risk of LUTS was 0.68 (95% CI 0.54-0.86) among men consuming vegetables daily compared with men consuming vegetables less frequently. Compared with men who eat meat less frequently, the confounder-adjusted risk of LUTS was 2.08 (95% CI 1.00-4.10) among men consuming meat weekly, and 2.56 (95% CI 1.30-5.02) among men consuming meat daily. The confounder-adjusted risk of LUTS was 0.73 (95% CI 0.58-0.93) among men who consumed butter compared to those who did not.

CONCLUSIONS

Dietary elements may also have an important role in the development of diseases causing LUTS. Direct effects of food components may likewise influence the occurrence of LUTS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Finland. jkoskimaki@koti.tpo.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10757270

Citation

Koskimäki, J, et al. "Association of Dietary Elements and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms." Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, vol. 34, no. 1, 2000, pp. 46-50.
Koskimäki J, Hakama M, Huhtala H, et al. Association of dietary elements and lower urinary tract symptoms. Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2000;34(1):46-50.
Koskimäki, J., Hakama, M., Huhtala, H., & Tammela, T. L. (2000). Association of dietary elements and lower urinary tract symptoms. Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology, 34(1), pp. 46-50.
Koskimäki J, et al. Association of Dietary Elements and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms. Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2000;34(1):46-50. PubMed PMID: 10757270.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of dietary elements and lower urinary tract symptoms. AU - Koskimäki,J, AU - Hakama,M, AU - Huhtala,H, AU - Tammela,T L, PY - 2000/4/11/pubmed PY - 2000/7/15/medline PY - 2000/4/11/entrez SP - 46 EP - 50 JF - Scandinavian journal of urology and nephrology JO - Scand. J. Urol. Nephrol. VL - 34 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to establish whether dietary elements are related to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and thus to diseases causing LUTS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This population-based study was carried out in 1994; a questionnaire was mailed to all men born in 1924, 1934 or 1944 living in Tampere or 11 rural or semi-rural municipalities in the same county, altogether 3143 men. Of this population, 68% were ultimately included in the study. A modified version of the DAN-PSS-1 questionnaire (10 of the questions) was used to assess urinary symptoms and problems arising from them. A symptom index was formed by multiplying the symptom and problem scores for hesitancy, incomplete emptying, urge, urge incontinence, nocturia and daytime frequency, and totalling the products. The men were also asked to report on their medical history, how often they ate vegetables and meat, whether they used butter, margarine or vegetable oil in food, how much alcohol and coffee they consumed, their smoking history and their weight and height. The risk of LUTS was estimated according to the frequency of meat and vegetable intake and the kind of fat used. RESULTS: The confounder-adjusted risk of LUTS was 0.68 (95% CI 0.54-0.86) among men consuming vegetables daily compared with men consuming vegetables less frequently. Compared with men who eat meat less frequently, the confounder-adjusted risk of LUTS was 2.08 (95% CI 1.00-4.10) among men consuming meat weekly, and 2.56 (95% CI 1.30-5.02) among men consuming meat daily. The confounder-adjusted risk of LUTS was 0.73 (95% CI 0.58-0.93) among men who consumed butter compared to those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary elements may also have an important role in the development of diseases causing LUTS. Direct effects of food components may likewise influence the occurrence of LUTS. SN - 0036-5599 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10757270/full_citation L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/003655900750016887 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -