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Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women.

Abstract

Few controlled trials have studied cholesterol-lowering diets in premenopausal women. None has examined the cholesterol-lowering effect of a low-fat vegetarian diet, which, in other population groups, leads to marked reductions in serum cholesterol concentrations and, in combination with other life-style changes, a regression of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that a low-fat, vegetarian diet significantly reduces serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations in premenopausal women. In a crossover design, 35 women, aged 22 to 48, followed a low-fat vegetarian diet deriving approximately 10% of energy from fat for 2 menstrual cycles. For 2 additional cycles, they followed their customary diet while also taking a "supplement" (placebo) pill. Serum lipid concentrations were assessed at baseline and during each intervention phase. Mean serum LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and total cholesterol concentrations decreased 16. 9%, 16.5%, and 13.2%, respectively, from baseline to the intervention diet phase (p<0.001), whereas mean serum triacylglycerol concentration increased 18.7% (p<0.01). LDL/HDL ratio remained unchanged. Thus, in healthy premenopausal women, a low-fat vegetarian diet led to rapid and sizable reductions in serum total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol concentrations.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington DC, USA. nbarnard@pcrm.org

    , , , ,

    Source

    The American journal of cardiology 85:8 2000 Apr 15 pg 969-72

    MeSH

    Adult
    Body Weight
    Cholesterol, HDL
    Cholesterol, LDL
    Cross-Over Studies
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Diet, Vegetarian
    Female
    Humans
    Lipids
    Menstrual Cycle
    Middle Aged
    Premenopause
    Weight Loss

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10760336

    Citation

    Barnard, N D., et al. "Effectiveness of a Low-fat Vegetarian Diet in Altering Serum Lipids in Healthy Premenopausal Women." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 85, no. 8, 2000, pp. 969-72.
    Barnard ND, Scialli AR, Bertron P, et al. Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women. Am J Cardiol. 2000;85(8):969-72.
    Barnard, N. D., Scialli, A. R., Bertron, P., Hurlock, D., Edmonds, K., & Talev, L. (2000). Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women. The American Journal of Cardiology, 85(8), pp. 969-72.
    Barnard ND, et al. Effectiveness of a Low-fat Vegetarian Diet in Altering Serum Lipids in Healthy Premenopausal Women. Am J Cardiol. 2000 Apr 15;85(8):969-72. PubMed PMID: 10760336.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women. AU - Barnard,N D, AU - Scialli,A R, AU - Bertron,P, AU - Hurlock,D, AU - Edmonds,K, AU - Talev,L, PY - 2000/4/13/pubmed PY - 2000/7/6/medline PY - 2000/4/13/entrez SP - 969 EP - 72 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am. J. Cardiol. VL - 85 IS - 8 N2 - Few controlled trials have studied cholesterol-lowering diets in premenopausal women. None has examined the cholesterol-lowering effect of a low-fat vegetarian diet, which, in other population groups, leads to marked reductions in serum cholesterol concentrations and, in combination with other life-style changes, a regression of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that a low-fat, vegetarian diet significantly reduces serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations in premenopausal women. In a crossover design, 35 women, aged 22 to 48, followed a low-fat vegetarian diet deriving approximately 10% of energy from fat for 2 menstrual cycles. For 2 additional cycles, they followed their customary diet while also taking a "supplement" (placebo) pill. Serum lipid concentrations were assessed at baseline and during each intervention phase. Mean serum LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and total cholesterol concentrations decreased 16. 9%, 16.5%, and 13.2%, respectively, from baseline to the intervention diet phase (p<0.001), whereas mean serum triacylglycerol concentration increased 18.7% (p<0.01). LDL/HDL ratio remained unchanged. Thus, in healthy premenopausal women, a low-fat vegetarian diet led to rapid and sizable reductions in serum total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol concentrations. SN - 0002-9149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10760336/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(99)00911-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -