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Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women.
Am J Cardiol 2000; 85(8):969-72AJ

Abstract

Few controlled trials have studied cholesterol-lowering diets in premenopausal women. None has examined the cholesterol-lowering effect of a low-fat vegetarian diet, which, in other population groups, leads to marked reductions in serum cholesterol concentrations and, in combination with other life-style changes, a regression of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that a low-fat, vegetarian diet significantly reduces serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations in premenopausal women. In a crossover design, 35 women, aged 22 to 48, followed a low-fat vegetarian diet deriving approximately 10% of energy from fat for 2 menstrual cycles. For 2 additional cycles, they followed their customary diet while also taking a "supplement" (placebo) pill. Serum lipid concentrations were assessed at baseline and during each intervention phase. Mean serum LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and total cholesterol concentrations decreased 16. 9%, 16.5%, and 13.2%, respectively, from baseline to the intervention diet phase (p<0.001), whereas mean serum triacylglycerol concentration increased 18.7% (p<0.01). LDL/HDL ratio remained unchanged. Thus, in healthy premenopausal women, a low-fat vegetarian diet led to rapid and sizable reductions in serum total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol concentrations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, Washington DC, USA. nbarnard@pcrm.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10760336

Citation

Barnard, N D., et al. "Effectiveness of a Low-fat Vegetarian Diet in Altering Serum Lipids in Healthy Premenopausal Women." The American Journal of Cardiology, vol. 85, no. 8, 2000, pp. 969-72.
Barnard ND, Scialli AR, Bertron P, et al. Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women. Am J Cardiol. 2000;85(8):969-72.
Barnard, N. D., Scialli, A. R., Bertron, P., Hurlock, D., Edmonds, K., & Talev, L. (2000). Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women. The American Journal of Cardiology, 85(8), pp. 969-72.
Barnard ND, et al. Effectiveness of a Low-fat Vegetarian Diet in Altering Serum Lipids in Healthy Premenopausal Women. Am J Cardiol. 2000 Apr 15;85(8):969-72. PubMed PMID: 10760336.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effectiveness of a low-fat vegetarian diet in altering serum lipids in healthy premenopausal women. AU - Barnard,N D, AU - Scialli,A R, AU - Bertron,P, AU - Hurlock,D, AU - Edmonds,K, AU - Talev,L, PY - 2000/4/13/pubmed PY - 2000/7/6/medline PY - 2000/4/13/entrez SP - 969 EP - 72 JF - The American journal of cardiology JO - Am. J. Cardiol. VL - 85 IS - 8 N2 - Few controlled trials have studied cholesterol-lowering diets in premenopausal women. None has examined the cholesterol-lowering effect of a low-fat vegetarian diet, which, in other population groups, leads to marked reductions in serum cholesterol concentrations and, in combination with other life-style changes, a regression of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that a low-fat, vegetarian diet significantly reduces serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations in premenopausal women. In a crossover design, 35 women, aged 22 to 48, followed a low-fat vegetarian diet deriving approximately 10% of energy from fat for 2 menstrual cycles. For 2 additional cycles, they followed their customary diet while also taking a "supplement" (placebo) pill. Serum lipid concentrations were assessed at baseline and during each intervention phase. Mean serum LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and total cholesterol concentrations decreased 16. 9%, 16.5%, and 13.2%, respectively, from baseline to the intervention diet phase (p<0.001), whereas mean serum triacylglycerol concentration increased 18.7% (p<0.01). LDL/HDL ratio remained unchanged. Thus, in healthy premenopausal women, a low-fat vegetarian diet led to rapid and sizable reductions in serum total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol concentrations. SN - 0002-9149 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10760336/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9149(99)00911-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -