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Effect of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on control of glycemia in dogs with naturally acquired diabetes mellitus.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2000 Apr 15; 216(8):1265-9.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate effect of acarbose on control of glycemia in dogs with diabetes mellitus.

DESIGN

Prospective randomized crossover controlled trial.

ANIMALS

5 dogs with naturally acquired diabetes mellitus.

PROCEDURE

Dogs were treated with acarbose and placebo for 2 months each: in 1 of 2 randomly assigned treatment sequences. Dogs that weighed < or = 10 kg (22 lb; n = 3) or > 10 kg (2) were given 25 or 50 mg of acarbose, respectively, at each meal for 2 weeks, then 50 or 100 mg of acarbose, respectively, at each meal for 6 weeks, with a 1-month interval between treatments. Caloric intake, type of insulin, and frequency of insulin administration were kept constant, and insulin dosage was adjusted as needed to maintain control of glycemia. Serum glucose concentrations, blood glycosylated hemoglobin concentration, and serum fructosamine concentration were determined.

RESULTS

Significant differences in mean body weight and daily insulin dosage among dogs treated with acarbose and placebo were not found. Mean preprandial serum glucose concentration, 8-hour mean serum glucose concentration, and blood glycosylated hemoglobin concentration were significantly lower in dogs treated with insulin and acarbose, compared with insulin and placebo. Semisoft to watery feces developed in 3 dogs treated with acarbose.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Acarbose may be useful as an adjunctive treatment in diabetic dogs in which cause for poor glycemic control cannot be identified, and insulin treatment alone is ineffective.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10767967

Citation

Nelson, R W., et al. "Effect of the Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitor Acarbose On Control of Glycemia in Dogs With Naturally Acquired Diabetes Mellitus." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 216, no. 8, 2000, pp. 1265-9.
Nelson RW, Robertson J, Feldman EC, et al. Effect of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on control of glycemia in dogs with naturally acquired diabetes mellitus. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2000;216(8):1265-9.
Nelson, R. W., Robertson, J., Feldman, E. C., & Briggs, C. (2000). Effect of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on control of glycemia in dogs with naturally acquired diabetes mellitus. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 216(8), 1265-9.
Nelson RW, et al. Effect of the Alpha-glucosidase Inhibitor Acarbose On Control of Glycemia in Dogs With Naturally Acquired Diabetes Mellitus. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2000 Apr 15;216(8):1265-9. PubMed PMID: 10767967.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitor acarbose on control of glycemia in dogs with naturally acquired diabetes mellitus. AU - Nelson,R W, AU - Robertson,J, AU - Feldman,E C, AU - Briggs,C, PY - 2000/4/18/pubmed PY - 2000/7/15/medline PY - 2000/4/18/entrez SP - 1265 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J Am Vet Med Assoc VL - 216 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate effect of acarbose on control of glycemia in dogs with diabetes mellitus. DESIGN: Prospective randomized crossover controlled trial. ANIMALS: 5 dogs with naturally acquired diabetes mellitus. PROCEDURE: Dogs were treated with acarbose and placebo for 2 months each: in 1 of 2 randomly assigned treatment sequences. Dogs that weighed < or = 10 kg (22 lb; n = 3) or > 10 kg (2) were given 25 or 50 mg of acarbose, respectively, at each meal for 2 weeks, then 50 or 100 mg of acarbose, respectively, at each meal for 6 weeks, with a 1-month interval between treatments. Caloric intake, type of insulin, and frequency of insulin administration were kept constant, and insulin dosage was adjusted as needed to maintain control of glycemia. Serum glucose concentrations, blood glycosylated hemoglobin concentration, and serum fructosamine concentration were determined. RESULTS: Significant differences in mean body weight and daily insulin dosage among dogs treated with acarbose and placebo were not found. Mean preprandial serum glucose concentration, 8-hour mean serum glucose concentration, and blood glycosylated hemoglobin concentration were significantly lower in dogs treated with insulin and acarbose, compared with insulin and placebo. Semisoft to watery feces developed in 3 dogs treated with acarbose. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Acarbose may be useful as an adjunctive treatment in diabetic dogs in which cause for poor glycemic control cannot be identified, and insulin treatment alone is ineffective. SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10767967/Effect_of_the_alpha_glucosidase_inhibitor_acarbose_on_control_of_glycemia_in_dogs_with_naturally_acquired_diabetes_mellitus_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -