Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Gallstone prevalence in Christchurch: risk factors and clinical significance.
N Z Med J 2000; 113(1104):46-8NZ

Abstract

AIMS

To determine the frequency, risk factors and clinical significance of gallstones in a New Zealand population.

METHODS

One thousand names were randomly selected from the Christchurch electoral rolls to recruit controls for a study on the prevalence of gallstones in diabetics. Three hundred and eighteen subjects (169 females, 149 males) were recruited and in this study we analyse this control group for gallstone disease. All subjects completed a questionnaire, provided a fasting blood sample and underwent an ultrasound examination of their gallbladder unless they had previously undergone a cholecystectomy.

RESULTS

Overall gallstone disease, defined as previous cholecystectomy or a positive scan for gallstones was seen in 20.75% of the 318 subjects recruited. Gallstone disease was more frequent in females (23.1%) compared to males (18.1%) but this difference was not statistically significant. For both genders there was a significant increase in gallstones with age. On univariate analysis, risk factors for gallstone disease included age, increased body mass index, family history of gallstones and decreased alcohol intake in females. However, only age and family history were significant on multiple logistic regression. There was no difference in the frequency of dyspeptic symptoms or abdominal pain between those with or without gallstones confirmed on scanning. The ratio of cholecystectomy to silent gallstones was higher in females (46.2%) than in males (22.2%).

CONCLUSION

Gallstones are prevalent in the New Zealand Community (20.8% overall). Risk factors are increasing age and family history. Gallstones detected on scanning were not associated with an increased incidence of dyspeptic symptoms or abdominal pain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, Christchurch Hospital.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10777222

Citation

Chapman, B A., et al. "Gallstone Prevalence in Christchurch: Risk Factors and Clinical Significance." The New Zealand Medical Journal, vol. 113, no. 1104, 2000, pp. 46-8.
Chapman BA, Frampton CM, Wilson IR, et al. Gallstone prevalence in Christchurch: risk factors and clinical significance. N Z Med J. 2000;113(1104):46-8.
Chapman, B. A., Frampton, C. M., Wilson, I. R., Chisholm, R. J., Allan, R. B., & Burt, M. J. (2000). Gallstone prevalence in Christchurch: risk factors and clinical significance. The New Zealand Medical Journal, 113(1104), pp. 46-8.
Chapman BA, et al. Gallstone Prevalence in Christchurch: Risk Factors and Clinical Significance. N Z Med J. 2000 Feb 25;113(1104):46-8. PubMed PMID: 10777222.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gallstone prevalence in Christchurch: risk factors and clinical significance. AU - Chapman,B A, AU - Frampton,C M, AU - Wilson,I R, AU - Chisholm,R J, AU - Allan,R B, AU - Burt,M J, PY - 2000/4/25/pubmed PY - 2000/4/25/medline PY - 2000/4/25/entrez SP - 46 EP - 8 JF - The New Zealand medical journal JO - N. Z. Med. J. VL - 113 IS - 1104 N2 - AIMS: To determine the frequency, risk factors and clinical significance of gallstones in a New Zealand population. METHODS: One thousand names were randomly selected from the Christchurch electoral rolls to recruit controls for a study on the prevalence of gallstones in diabetics. Three hundred and eighteen subjects (169 females, 149 males) were recruited and in this study we analyse this control group for gallstone disease. All subjects completed a questionnaire, provided a fasting blood sample and underwent an ultrasound examination of their gallbladder unless they had previously undergone a cholecystectomy. RESULTS: Overall gallstone disease, defined as previous cholecystectomy or a positive scan for gallstones was seen in 20.75% of the 318 subjects recruited. Gallstone disease was more frequent in females (23.1%) compared to males (18.1%) but this difference was not statistically significant. For both genders there was a significant increase in gallstones with age. On univariate analysis, risk factors for gallstone disease included age, increased body mass index, family history of gallstones and decreased alcohol intake in females. However, only age and family history were significant on multiple logistic regression. There was no difference in the frequency of dyspeptic symptoms or abdominal pain between those with or without gallstones confirmed on scanning. The ratio of cholecystectomy to silent gallstones was higher in females (46.2%) than in males (22.2%). CONCLUSION: Gallstones are prevalent in the New Zealand Community (20.8% overall). Risk factors are increasing age and family history. Gallstones detected on scanning were not associated with an increased incidence of dyspeptic symptoms or abdominal pain. SN - 0028-8446 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10777222/Gallstone_prevalence_in_Christchurch:_risk_factors_and_clinical_significance_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/gallstones.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -