Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Toxoplasmic encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.
J Assoc Physicians India 1999; 47(7):680-4JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To study the clinical course and outcome of toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

METHODS

Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and neurological abnormality compatible with diagnosis of TE were enrolled in the study. These patients were treated with combination of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and pyrimethamine. Response to therapy was assessed by clinical examination and repeat CT/MRI scan done after three weeks of starting treatment. Those showing response were put on prophylactic therapy.

RESULTS

A total of 451 patients of HIV infections were admitted to this centre during the study period, of these 11 patients were diagnosed to have TE. The common presenting symptoms were fever (80%), seizures (45%), headache (45%) and altered sensorium (25%). Focal neurological deficit was present in 80% of cases. Nine cases had ring-enhancing lesions on CT scan while in the remaining two patient's ring lesions were seen on MRI. These were either multiple (55%) or solitary (45%). Antitoxoplasma antibody was detected in 10 patients. It was absent in one patient. Ten patients had clinical and radiological improvement with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and pyrimethamine within 10 +/- 3 days of starting therapy. One patient died within 10 days of starting therapy.

CONCLUSION

Toxoplasmosis is a common opportunistic infection of the central nervous system in patients with AIDS. Majority of patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis present with focal neurological abnormality in presence of characteristic neuroradiological abnormality and positive antitoxoplasma antibody titer. Response to empirical therapy helps to confirm the diagnosis, lifelong prophylaxis there after prevents relapse of potentially fatal and easily treatable condition.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10778586

Citation

Chaddha, D S., et al. "Toxoplasmic Encephalitis in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome." The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India, vol. 47, no. 7, 1999, pp. 680-4.
Chaddha DS, Kalra SP, Singh AP, et al. Toxoplasmic encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. J Assoc Physicians India. 1999;47(7):680-4.
Chaddha, D. S., Kalra, S. P., Singh, A. P., Gupta, R. M., & Sanchetee, P. C. (1999). Toxoplasmic encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India, 47(7), pp. 680-4.
Chaddha DS, et al. Toxoplasmic Encephalitis in Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. J Assoc Physicians India. 1999;47(7):680-4. PubMed PMID: 10778586.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Toxoplasmic encephalitis in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. AU - Chaddha,D S, AU - Kalra,S P, AU - Singh,A P, AU - Gupta,R M, AU - Sanchetee,P C, PY - 2000/4/25/pubmed PY - 2000/6/10/medline PY - 2000/4/25/entrez SP - 680 EP - 4 JF - The Journal of the Association of Physicians of India JO - J Assoc Physicians India VL - 47 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To study the clinical course and outcome of toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). METHODS: Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and neurological abnormality compatible with diagnosis of TE were enrolled in the study. These patients were treated with combination of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and pyrimethamine. Response to therapy was assessed by clinical examination and repeat CT/MRI scan done after three weeks of starting treatment. Those showing response were put on prophylactic therapy. RESULTS: A total of 451 patients of HIV infections were admitted to this centre during the study period, of these 11 patients were diagnosed to have TE. The common presenting symptoms were fever (80%), seizures (45%), headache (45%) and altered sensorium (25%). Focal neurological deficit was present in 80% of cases. Nine cases had ring-enhancing lesions on CT scan while in the remaining two patient's ring lesions were seen on MRI. These were either multiple (55%) or solitary (45%). Antitoxoplasma antibody was detected in 10 patients. It was absent in one patient. Ten patients had clinical and radiological improvement with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and pyrimethamine within 10 +/- 3 days of starting therapy. One patient died within 10 days of starting therapy. CONCLUSION: Toxoplasmosis is a common opportunistic infection of the central nervous system in patients with AIDS. Majority of patients with cerebral toxoplasmosis present with focal neurological abnormality in presence of characteristic neuroradiological abnormality and positive antitoxoplasma antibody titer. Response to empirical therapy helps to confirm the diagnosis, lifelong prophylaxis there after prevents relapse of potentially fatal and easily treatable condition. SN - 0004-5772 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10778586/Toxoplasmic_encephalitis_in_acquired_immunodeficiency_syndrome_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/hivaidsandinfections.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -