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Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches.
Clin Exp Allergy 1993; 23(12):982-5CE

Abstract

Histamine-induced food intolerance is not IgE-mediated. Skin-prick testing and specific IgE to food allergens are typically negative. Food rich in histamine or red wine may cause allergy-like symptoms such as sneezing, flush, skin itching, diarrhoea and even shortness of breath. The suspected reason is a diminished histamine degradation based on a deficiency of diamine oxidase. As diamine oxidase cannot be supplemented, a histamine-free diet was implemented to reduce histamine intake. Forty-five patients with a history of suffering from intolerance to food or wine (n = 17) and chronic headache (n = 28) were put on the diet over months to years. Fish, cheese, hard cured sausages, pickled cabbage and alcoholic beverages had to be avoided. Complaint intensity and drug-use per week prior to and 4 weeks after a histamine-free diet were compared. After 4 weeks on the diet 33/45 patients improved considerably (P < 0.01), eight of them had total remission. In 12/45 patients, however, no changes in symptoms were observed. Symptoms of food or wine intolerance significantly decreased (P < 0.02; treatment of choice), headaches decreased in frequency (P < 0.001), duration and intensity. After eating histamine-rich food symptoms were reproducible and could be eliminated by anti-histamines in most patients. These data indicate the role of histamine in food and wine intolerance and that histamine-rich food causes a worsening of symptoms in patients suffering from chronic headaches. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a deficiency of diamine oxidase in patients with intolerance to food or wine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dermatologic and Pediatric Allergy Clinic Vienna, Austria.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10779289

Citation

Wantke, F, et al. "Histamine-free Diet: Treatment of Choice for Histamine-induced Food Intolerance and Supporting Treatment for Chronic Headaches." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 23, no. 12, 1993, pp. 982-5.
Wantke F, Götz M, Jarisch R. Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches. Clin Exp Allergy. 1993;23(12):982-5.
Wantke, F., Götz, M., & Jarisch, R. (1993). Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 23(12), pp. 982-5.
Wantke F, Götz M, Jarisch R. Histamine-free Diet: Treatment of Choice for Histamine-induced Food Intolerance and Supporting Treatment for Chronic Headaches. Clin Exp Allergy. 1993;23(12):982-5. PubMed PMID: 10779289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches. AU - Wantke,F, AU - Götz,M, AU - Jarisch,R, PY - 1993/12/1/pubmed PY - 2000/6/24/medline PY - 1993/12/1/entrez SP - 982 EP - 5 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin. Exp. Allergy VL - 23 IS - 12 N2 - Histamine-induced food intolerance is not IgE-mediated. Skin-prick testing and specific IgE to food allergens are typically negative. Food rich in histamine or red wine may cause allergy-like symptoms such as sneezing, flush, skin itching, diarrhoea and even shortness of breath. The suspected reason is a diminished histamine degradation based on a deficiency of diamine oxidase. As diamine oxidase cannot be supplemented, a histamine-free diet was implemented to reduce histamine intake. Forty-five patients with a history of suffering from intolerance to food or wine (n = 17) and chronic headache (n = 28) were put on the diet over months to years. Fish, cheese, hard cured sausages, pickled cabbage and alcoholic beverages had to be avoided. Complaint intensity and drug-use per week prior to and 4 weeks after a histamine-free diet were compared. After 4 weeks on the diet 33/45 patients improved considerably (P < 0.01), eight of them had total remission. In 12/45 patients, however, no changes in symptoms were observed. Symptoms of food or wine intolerance significantly decreased (P < 0.02; treatment of choice), headaches decreased in frequency (P < 0.001), duration and intensity. After eating histamine-rich food symptoms were reproducible and could be eliminated by anti-histamines in most patients. These data indicate the role of histamine in food and wine intolerance and that histamine-rich food causes a worsening of symptoms in patients suffering from chronic headaches. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a deficiency of diamine oxidase in patients with intolerance to food or wine. SN - 0954-7894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10779289/Histamine_free_diet:_treatment_of_choice_for_histamine_induced_food_intolerance_and_supporting_treatment_for_chronic_headaches_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0954-7894&amp;date=1993&amp;volume=23&amp;issue=12&amp;spage=982 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -