Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches.
Clin Exp Allergy. 1993 Dec; 23(12):982-5.CE

Abstract

Histamine-induced food intolerance is not IgE-mediated. Skin-prick testing and specific IgE to food allergens are typically negative. Food rich in histamine or red wine may cause allergy-like symptoms such as sneezing, flush, skin itching, diarrhoea and even shortness of breath. The suspected reason is a diminished histamine degradation based on a deficiency of diamine oxidase. As diamine oxidase cannot be supplemented, a histamine-free diet was implemented to reduce histamine intake. Forty-five patients with a history of suffering from intolerance to food or wine (n = 17) and chronic headache (n = 28) were put on the diet over months to years. Fish, cheese, hard cured sausages, pickled cabbage and alcoholic beverages had to be avoided. Complaint intensity and drug-use per week prior to and 4 weeks after a histamine-free diet were compared. After 4 weeks on the diet 33/45 patients improved considerably (P < 0.01), eight of them had total remission. In 12/45 patients, however, no changes in symptoms were observed. Symptoms of food or wine intolerance significantly decreased (P < 0.02; treatment of choice), headaches decreased in frequency (P < 0.001), duration and intensity. After eating histamine-rich food symptoms were reproducible and could be eliminated by anti-histamines in most patients. These data indicate the role of histamine in food and wine intolerance and that histamine-rich food causes a worsening of symptoms in patients suffering from chronic headaches. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a deficiency of diamine oxidase in patients with intolerance to food or wine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dermatologic and Pediatric Allergy Clinic Vienna, Austria.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10779289

Citation

Wantke, F, et al. "Histamine-free Diet: Treatment of Choice for Histamine-induced Food Intolerance and Supporting Treatment for Chronic Headaches." Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 23, no. 12, 1993, pp. 982-5.
Wantke F, Götz M, Jarisch R. Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches. Clin Exp Allergy. 1993;23(12):982-5.
Wantke, F., Götz, M., & Jarisch, R. (1993). Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches. Clinical and Experimental Allergy : Journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 23(12), 982-5.
Wantke F, Götz M, Jarisch R. Histamine-free Diet: Treatment of Choice for Histamine-induced Food Intolerance and Supporting Treatment for Chronic Headaches. Clin Exp Allergy. 1993;23(12):982-5. PubMed PMID: 10779289.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches. AU - Wantke,F, AU - Götz,M, AU - Jarisch,R, PY - 1993/12/1/pubmed PY - 2000/6/24/medline PY - 1993/12/1/entrez SP - 982 EP - 5 JF - Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology JO - Clin. Exp. Allergy VL - 23 IS - 12 N2 - Histamine-induced food intolerance is not IgE-mediated. Skin-prick testing and specific IgE to food allergens are typically negative. Food rich in histamine or red wine may cause allergy-like symptoms such as sneezing, flush, skin itching, diarrhoea and even shortness of breath. The suspected reason is a diminished histamine degradation based on a deficiency of diamine oxidase. As diamine oxidase cannot be supplemented, a histamine-free diet was implemented to reduce histamine intake. Forty-five patients with a history of suffering from intolerance to food or wine (n = 17) and chronic headache (n = 28) were put on the diet over months to years. Fish, cheese, hard cured sausages, pickled cabbage and alcoholic beverages had to be avoided. Complaint intensity and drug-use per week prior to and 4 weeks after a histamine-free diet were compared. After 4 weeks on the diet 33/45 patients improved considerably (P < 0.01), eight of them had total remission. In 12/45 patients, however, no changes in symptoms were observed. Symptoms of food or wine intolerance significantly decreased (P < 0.02; treatment of choice), headaches decreased in frequency (P < 0.001), duration and intensity. After eating histamine-rich food symptoms were reproducible and could be eliminated by anti-histamines in most patients. These data indicate the role of histamine in food and wine intolerance and that histamine-rich food causes a worsening of symptoms in patients suffering from chronic headaches. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a deficiency of diamine oxidase in patients with intolerance to food or wine. SN - 0954-7894 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10779289/Histamine_free_diet:_treatment_of_choice_for_histamine_induced_food_intolerance_and_supporting_treatment_for_chronic_headaches_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0954-7894&amp;date=1993&amp;volume=23&amp;issue=12&amp;spage=982 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -