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Prevalence of human parvovirus B19 and TT virus in a group of young haemophiliacs in South Africa.
Haemophilia. 2000 Mar; 6(2):93-7.H

Abstract

A well recognized hazard of transfusion with blood or blood products is the acquisition of a viral infection. Parvovirus B19 and transfusion transmitted virus (TTV) are two of several non-enveloped viruses that may on rare occasions be present in coagulation factor concentrates. The prevalence of these viruses in the South African Haemophilia population has not previously been studied. Thirty-nine Haemophiliac children were investigated for evidence of parvovirus and TTV infection. 26 boys with Haemophilia A had been treated with cryoprecipitate or intermediate purity factor VIII, and 13 boys with Haemophilia B had received prothrombin complex concentrates. All the plasma products were prepared from South African donors and were virally inactivated by heat or solvent/detergent since 1992. A control group of 32 children who had not been transfused were also studied. IgG antibodies to B19 were present in 29 of the 39 patients (74%), 18/26 (69%) with Haemophilia A and 12 of the 13 (85%) with Haemophilia B. None of the patients was IgM antibody positive but two children were PCR positive for B19 DNA. Of the control children, 47% had IgG antibodies to B19, but none were IgM antibody or B19 DNA positive. TTV viral DNA was found in 10.2% of patients and in 9% of the control group. The results indicate that our locally produced plasma products are not a significant source of TTV transmitted infection but may contribute to infection by B19 parvovirus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The University of Cape Town, Leukaemia Centre and the Department of Haematology, Groote Schuur Hospital, Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10781195

Citation

Rubinstein, R, et al. "Prevalence of Human Parvovirus B19 and TT Virus in a Group of Young Haemophiliacs in South Africa." Haemophilia : the Official Journal of the World Federation of Hemophilia, vol. 6, no. 2, 2000, pp. 93-7.
Rubinstein R, Karabus CD, Smuts H, et al. Prevalence of human parvovirus B19 and TT virus in a group of young haemophiliacs in South Africa. Haemophilia. 2000;6(2):93-7.
Rubinstein, R., Karabus, C. D., Smuts, H., Kolia, F., & Van Rensburg, E. J. (2000). Prevalence of human parvovirus B19 and TT virus in a group of young haemophiliacs in South Africa. Haemophilia : the Official Journal of the World Federation of Hemophilia, 6(2), 93-7.
Rubinstein R, et al. Prevalence of Human Parvovirus B19 and TT Virus in a Group of Young Haemophiliacs in South Africa. Haemophilia. 2000;6(2):93-7. PubMed PMID: 10781195.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence of human parvovirus B19 and TT virus in a group of young haemophiliacs in South Africa. AU - Rubinstein,R, AU - Karabus,C D, AU - Smuts,H, AU - Kolia,F, AU - Van Rensburg,E J, PY - 2000/4/26/pubmed PY - 2000/5/20/medline PY - 2000/4/26/entrez SP - 93 EP - 7 JF - Haemophilia : the official journal of the World Federation of Hemophilia JO - Haemophilia VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - A well recognized hazard of transfusion with blood or blood products is the acquisition of a viral infection. Parvovirus B19 and transfusion transmitted virus (TTV) are two of several non-enveloped viruses that may on rare occasions be present in coagulation factor concentrates. The prevalence of these viruses in the South African Haemophilia population has not previously been studied. Thirty-nine Haemophiliac children were investigated for evidence of parvovirus and TTV infection. 26 boys with Haemophilia A had been treated with cryoprecipitate or intermediate purity factor VIII, and 13 boys with Haemophilia B had received prothrombin complex concentrates. All the plasma products were prepared from South African donors and were virally inactivated by heat or solvent/detergent since 1992. A control group of 32 children who had not been transfused were also studied. IgG antibodies to B19 were present in 29 of the 39 patients (74%), 18/26 (69%) with Haemophilia A and 12 of the 13 (85%) with Haemophilia B. None of the patients was IgM antibody positive but two children were PCR positive for B19 DNA. Of the control children, 47% had IgG antibodies to B19, but none were IgM antibody or B19 DNA positive. TTV viral DNA was found in 10.2% of patients and in 9% of the control group. The results indicate that our locally produced plasma products are not a significant source of TTV transmitted infection but may contribute to infection by B19 parvovirus. SN - 1351-8216 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10781195/Prevalence_of_human_parvovirus_B19_and_TT_virus_in_a_group_of_young_haemophiliacs_in_South_Africa_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1351-8216&date=2000&volume=6&issue=2&spage=93 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -