Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Probiotic culture survival and implications in fermented frozen yogurt characteristics.
J Dairy Sci 2000; 83(4):666-73JD

Abstract

Low-fat ice cream mix was fermented with probiotic-supplemented and traditional starter culture systems and evaluated for culture survival, composition, and sensory characteristics of frozen product. Fermentations were stopped when the titratable acidity reached 0.15% greater than the initial titratable acidity (end point 1) or when the pH reached 5.6 (end point 2). Mix was frozen and stored for 11 wk at -20 degrees C. The traditional yogurt culture system contained the strains Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus. The probiotic-supplemented system contained the traditional cultures as well as Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus. We compared recovery of Bifodobacterium by three methods, a repair-detection system with roll-tubes and plates on modified bifid glucose medium and plates with maltose + galactose reinforced clostridial medium. Culture bacteria in both systems did not decrease in the yogurt during frozen storage. The roll-tube method with modified bifid glucose agar and repair detection system provided at least one-half log10 cfu/ml higher recovery of B. longum compared with recoveries using modified bifid glucose agar or maltose + galactose reinforced clostridial agar on petri plates. No change in concentrations of lactose or protein for products fermented with either culture system occurred during storage. Acid flavor was more intense when product was fermented to pH 5.6, but yogurt flavor was not intensified. The presence of probiotic bacteria in the supplemented system seemed to cause no differences in protein and lactose concentration and sensory characteristics.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Technology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg 24061-0418, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10791781

Citation

Davidson, R H., et al. "Probiotic Culture Survival and Implications in Fermented Frozen Yogurt Characteristics." Journal of Dairy Science, vol. 83, no. 4, 2000, pp. 666-73.
Davidson RH, Duncan SE, Hackney CR, et al. Probiotic culture survival and implications in fermented frozen yogurt characteristics. J Dairy Sci. 2000;83(4):666-73.
Davidson, R. H., Duncan, S. E., Hackney, C. R., Eigel, W. N., & Boling, J. W. (2000). Probiotic culture survival and implications in fermented frozen yogurt characteristics. Journal of Dairy Science, 83(4), pp. 666-73.
Davidson RH, et al. Probiotic Culture Survival and Implications in Fermented Frozen Yogurt Characteristics. J Dairy Sci. 2000;83(4):666-73. PubMed PMID: 10791781.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Probiotic culture survival and implications in fermented frozen yogurt characteristics. AU - Davidson,R H, AU - Duncan,S E, AU - Hackney,C R, AU - Eigel,W N, AU - Boling,J W, PY - 2000/5/3/pubmed PY - 2000/6/24/medline PY - 2000/5/3/entrez SP - 666 EP - 73 JF - Journal of dairy science JO - J. Dairy Sci. VL - 83 IS - 4 N2 - Low-fat ice cream mix was fermented with probiotic-supplemented and traditional starter culture systems and evaluated for culture survival, composition, and sensory characteristics of frozen product. Fermentations were stopped when the titratable acidity reached 0.15% greater than the initial titratable acidity (end point 1) or when the pH reached 5.6 (end point 2). Mix was frozen and stored for 11 wk at -20 degrees C. The traditional yogurt culture system contained the strains Streptococcus salivarius ssp. thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus. The probiotic-supplemented system contained the traditional cultures as well as Bifidobacterium longum and Lactobacillus acidophilus. We compared recovery of Bifodobacterium by three methods, a repair-detection system with roll-tubes and plates on modified bifid glucose medium and plates with maltose + galactose reinforced clostridial medium. Culture bacteria in both systems did not decrease in the yogurt during frozen storage. The roll-tube method with modified bifid glucose agar and repair detection system provided at least one-half log10 cfu/ml higher recovery of B. longum compared with recoveries using modified bifid glucose agar or maltose + galactose reinforced clostridial agar on petri plates. No change in concentrations of lactose or protein for products fermented with either culture system occurred during storage. Acid flavor was more intense when product was fermented to pH 5.6, but yogurt flavor was not intensified. The presence of probiotic bacteria in the supplemented system seemed to cause no differences in protein and lactose concentration and sensory characteristics. SN - 0022-0302 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10791781/Probiotic_culture_survival_and_implications_in_fermented_frozen_yogurt_characteristics_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-0302(00)74927-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -