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Sickle cell anemia: a potential nutritional approach for a molecular disease.

Abstract

A certain population of red blood cells in patients with sickle cell anemia has an elevated density and possesses an abnormal membrane. These "dense cells" have a tendency to adhere to neutrophils, platelets, and vascular endothelial cells, and, thus, they could trigger vasoocclusion and the subsequent painful crisis from which these patients suffer. We developed a laboratory method of preparing such dense cells and found that nutritional antioxidant supplements, hydroxyl radical scavengers, and iron-binding agents could inhibit the formation of dense cells in vitro. The concentrations at which effective nutritional supplements could inhibit dense cell formation by 50% were 4.0 mg/mL for aged garlic extract, 0.38 mg/mL for black tea extract, 0.13 mg/mL for green tea extract, 0.07 mg/mL for Pycnogenol, 930 microM for alpha-lipoic acid, 270 microM for vitamin E, 45 microM for coenzyme Q(10), and 32 microM for beta-carotene. Both an ex vivo study and a pilot clinical trial demonstrated that a cocktail consisting of daily doses of 6 g of aged garlic extract, 4-6 g of vitamin C, and 800 to 1200 IU of vitamin E may indeed be beneficial to the patients.

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    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Anemia, Sickle Cell
    Antioxidants
    Centrifugation, Density Gradient
    Dietary Supplements
    Female
    Hematocrit
    Humans
    Male
    Pilot Projects

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Controlled Clinical Trial
    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10793299

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Sickle cell anemia: a potential nutritional approach for a molecular disease. AU - Ohnishi,S T, AU - Ohnishi,T, AU - Ogunmola,G B, PY - 2000/5/4/pubmed PY - 2000/7/8/medline PY - 2000/5/4/entrez SP - 330 EP - 8 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 16 IS - 5 N2 - A certain population of red blood cells in patients with sickle cell anemia has an elevated density and possesses an abnormal membrane. These "dense cells" have a tendency to adhere to neutrophils, platelets, and vascular endothelial cells, and, thus, they could trigger vasoocclusion and the subsequent painful crisis from which these patients suffer. We developed a laboratory method of preparing such dense cells and found that nutritional antioxidant supplements, hydroxyl radical scavengers, and iron-binding agents could inhibit the formation of dense cells in vitro. The concentrations at which effective nutritional supplements could inhibit dense cell formation by 50% were 4.0 mg/mL for aged garlic extract, 0.38 mg/mL for black tea extract, 0.13 mg/mL for green tea extract, 0.07 mg/mL for Pycnogenol, 930 microM for alpha-lipoic acid, 270 microM for vitamin E, 45 microM for coenzyme Q(10), and 32 microM for beta-carotene. Both an ex vivo study and a pilot clinical trial demonstrated that a cocktail consisting of daily doses of 6 g of aged garlic extract, 4-6 g of vitamin C, and 800 to 1200 IU of vitamin E may indeed be beneficial to the patients. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10793299/full_citation L2 - http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(00)00257-4 ER -