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Effects of wheat bran and Olestra on objective measures of stool and subjective reports of GI symptoms.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2000 May; 95(5):1244-52.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two nondigested, nonabsorbed dietary components on objective and subjective measures of gastrointestinal (GI) function.

METHODS

A placebo-controlled parallel study compared the effects of wheat bran (20 g/day or 40 g/day in cereal), a well-known dietary fiber, with those of olestra (20 g or 40 g/day in potato chips), a nonabsorbed fat, on stool output, stool apparent viscosity (log peak force for extrusion [PF]), stool water content, and GI symptoms. Sixty subjects resided on a metabolic ward for 9 days: 3 days baseline and 6 days treatment.

RESULTS

Compared with placebo, consumption of 20 g/day wheat bran for 6 days resulted in a rapid (within 38 h) increase in mean (+/-SE) stool output (placebo, 150 +/- 29 g/day; bran, 246 +/- 35 g/day, p < 0.05), a directional increase in mean stool water content (placebo, 81.2 +/- 0.8%; bran, 83.9 +/- 0.8%), stool water output (placebo, 159 +/- 54 g/day; bran, 238 +/- 30 g/day), and bowel movement frequency (BM/day) (placebo, 2.2 +/- 0.4; bran, 2.6 +/- 0.4), and no stool-softening effect (placebo log PF, 2.9 +/- 0.1 g; bran log PF, 2.9 +/- 0.1 g). Wheat bran 40 g/day results were not significantly different from wheat bran 20 g/day. Compared with placebo, consumption of olestra 20 g/day and 40 g/day for 6 days showed no significant difference in mean stool output (151 +/- 18 g/day and 204 +/- 28 g/day, respectively), mean BM frequency (1.8 +/- 0.2 BM/day and 2.1 +/- 0.3 BM/day, respectively), and stool water output (138 +/- 13 g/day and 184 +/- 31 g/day, respectively), a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in stool water content (75.5 +/- 1.7% and 72.6 +/- 2.2%, respectively), and either no effect on stool apparent viscosity (olestra 20 g/day, mean log PF, 3.0 +/- 0.1 g) or a gradual stool-softening effect beginning study day 6 (olestra 40 g/day, log PF, 2.7 +/- 0.1 g). None of the treatment groups showed a significant increase in GI symptoms compared with placebo.

CONCLUSIONS

Consumption of wheat bran in excess of levels in a typical Western diet significantly increased stool output, but did not soften normal-viscosity stool nor result in an increase in common GI symptoms. The observed plateau effect for wheat bran at 40 g/day suggests a maximal mechanical stimulatory effect. Consumption of olestra in excess of usual snacking conditions did not result in a significant increase in stool output or common GI symptoms. At the highest level tested, olestra resulted in a gradual stool-softening effect after several days of consumption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Procter & Gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10811335

Citation

McRorie, J, et al. "Effects of Wheat Bran and Olestra On Objective Measures of Stool and Subjective Reports of GI Symptoms." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 95, no. 5, 2000, pp. 1244-52.
McRorie J, Kesler J, Bishop L, et al. Effects of wheat bran and Olestra on objective measures of stool and subjective reports of GI symptoms. Am J Gastroenterol. 2000;95(5):1244-52.
McRorie, J., Kesler, J., Bishop, L., Filloon, T., Allgood, G., Sutton, M., Hunt, T., Laurent, A., & Rudolph, C. (2000). Effects of wheat bran and Olestra on objective measures of stool and subjective reports of GI symptoms. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 95(5), 1244-52.
McRorie J, et al. Effects of Wheat Bran and Olestra On Objective Measures of Stool and Subjective Reports of GI Symptoms. Am J Gastroenterol. 2000;95(5):1244-52. PubMed PMID: 10811335.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of wheat bran and Olestra on objective measures of stool and subjective reports of GI symptoms. AU - McRorie,J, AU - Kesler,J, AU - Bishop,L, AU - Filloon,T, AU - Allgood,G, AU - Sutton,M, AU - Hunt,T, AU - Laurent,A, AU - Rudolph,C, PY - 2000/5/16/pubmed PY - 2000/6/3/medline PY - 2000/5/16/entrez SP - 1244 EP - 52 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 95 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of two nondigested, nonabsorbed dietary components on objective and subjective measures of gastrointestinal (GI) function. METHODS: A placebo-controlled parallel study compared the effects of wheat bran (20 g/day or 40 g/day in cereal), a well-known dietary fiber, with those of olestra (20 g or 40 g/day in potato chips), a nonabsorbed fat, on stool output, stool apparent viscosity (log peak force for extrusion [PF]), stool water content, and GI symptoms. Sixty subjects resided on a metabolic ward for 9 days: 3 days baseline and 6 days treatment. RESULTS: Compared with placebo, consumption of 20 g/day wheat bran for 6 days resulted in a rapid (within 38 h) increase in mean (+/-SE) stool output (placebo, 150 +/- 29 g/day; bran, 246 +/- 35 g/day, p < 0.05), a directional increase in mean stool water content (placebo, 81.2 +/- 0.8%; bran, 83.9 +/- 0.8%), stool water output (placebo, 159 +/- 54 g/day; bran, 238 +/- 30 g/day), and bowel movement frequency (BM/day) (placebo, 2.2 +/- 0.4; bran, 2.6 +/- 0.4), and no stool-softening effect (placebo log PF, 2.9 +/- 0.1 g; bran log PF, 2.9 +/- 0.1 g). Wheat bran 40 g/day results were not significantly different from wheat bran 20 g/day. Compared with placebo, consumption of olestra 20 g/day and 40 g/day for 6 days showed no significant difference in mean stool output (151 +/- 18 g/day and 204 +/- 28 g/day, respectively), mean BM frequency (1.8 +/- 0.2 BM/day and 2.1 +/- 0.3 BM/day, respectively), and stool water output (138 +/- 13 g/day and 184 +/- 31 g/day, respectively), a significant (p < 0.05) decrease in stool water content (75.5 +/- 1.7% and 72.6 +/- 2.2%, respectively), and either no effect on stool apparent viscosity (olestra 20 g/day, mean log PF, 3.0 +/- 0.1 g) or a gradual stool-softening effect beginning study day 6 (olestra 40 g/day, log PF, 2.7 +/- 0.1 g). None of the treatment groups showed a significant increase in GI symptoms compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Consumption of wheat bran in excess of levels in a typical Western diet significantly increased stool output, but did not soften normal-viscosity stool nor result in an increase in common GI symptoms. The observed plateau effect for wheat bran at 40 g/day suggests a maximal mechanical stimulatory effect. Consumption of olestra in excess of usual snacking conditions did not result in a significant increase in stool output or common GI symptoms. At the highest level tested, olestra resulted in a gradual stool-softening effect after several days of consumption. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10811335/Effects_of_wheat_bran_and_Olestra_on_objective_measures_of_stool_and_subjective_reports_of_GI_symptoms_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -