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Effect of growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, and insulin on bacterial translocation in experimental short bowel syndrome.
J Pediatr Surg. 2000 May; 35(5):692-5.JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND/PURPOSE

An adaptive process starts in the remaining intestine after massive resection, and several trophic factors including growth hormone (GH), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin (INS) have been shown to have a positive effect on it. Bacterial translocation (BT) is frequent after extensive small bowel resection, but the effects of GH, EGF, or INS have not been investigated in experimental short bowel syndrome (SBS). This study tests the hypothesis that GH, EGF, or INS decrease BT in SBS in rats with parenteral nutrition (PN).

METHODS

Thirty-eight adult Wistar rats underwent central venous cannulation and were assigned randomly to 1 of 4 groups receiving for 10 days 4 treatment regimes: (1) PN group (n = 10): fasting, all-in-one PN solution (300 mL/kg/24 h, 280 kcal/kg/24 h), 80% gut resection including ileo-cecal valve; (2) GH group (n = 9): fasting, same PN regime and resection, GH (1 mg/kg/d, subcutaneously); (3) EGF group (n = 9): fasting, PN, resection, EGF (150 microg/24 h intravenously); (4) INS group (n = 9): fasting, PN, resection, INS (1 UI/100 g/24 h subcutaneously). At the end of the experiment they were killed, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and peripheral and portal blood samples were recovered and cultured. Several fragments of intestine were taken to determine cell proliferation (PCNA index) and morphometric parameters (villous height, crypt depth).

RESULTS

GH, EGF, and INS groups showed a 28%, 29%, and 30% increase in gut mucosal thickness, and PCNA index rose 21%, 20%, and 25%, respectively in comparison with PN controls. Bacterial translocation to peripheral blood was detected in 0% of PN animals and in 44%, 40%, and 28% of GH, EGF, or INS rats, respectively (P < .05). No differences were found in BT in MLN or portal blood among groups.

CONCLUSION

Administration of GH, EGF, or INS improves gut mucosal structure in rats with SBS under PN, but, surprisingly, the incidence of BT detected in peripheral blood was increased rather than decreased in animals receiving these treatments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Surgery, Hospital Aranzazu, San Sebastian, Spain.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10813326

Citation

Eizaguirre, I, et al. "Effect of Growth Hormone, Epidermal Growth Factor, and Insulin On Bacterial Translocation in Experimental Short Bowel Syndrome." Journal of Pediatric Surgery, vol. 35, no. 5, 2000, pp. 692-5.
Eizaguirre I, Aldazabal P, Barrena MJ, et al. Effect of growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, and insulin on bacterial translocation in experimental short bowel syndrome. J Pediatr Surg. 2000;35(5):692-5.
Eizaguirre, I., Aldazabal, P., Barrena, M. J., Garcia-Arenzana, J. M., Ariz, C., Candelas, S., & Tovar, J. A. (2000). Effect of growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, and insulin on bacterial translocation in experimental short bowel syndrome. Journal of Pediatric Surgery, 35(5), 692-5.
Eizaguirre I, et al. Effect of Growth Hormone, Epidermal Growth Factor, and Insulin On Bacterial Translocation in Experimental Short Bowel Syndrome. J Pediatr Surg. 2000;35(5):692-5. PubMed PMID: 10813326.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, and insulin on bacterial translocation in experimental short bowel syndrome. AU - Eizaguirre,I, AU - Aldazabal,P, AU - Barrena,M J, AU - Garcia-Arenzana,J M, AU - Ariz,C, AU - Candelas,S, AU - Tovar,J A, PY - 2000/5/17/pubmed PY - 2000/7/25/medline PY - 2000/5/17/entrez SP - 692 EP - 5 JF - Journal of pediatric surgery JO - J Pediatr Surg VL - 35 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: An adaptive process starts in the remaining intestine after massive resection, and several trophic factors including growth hormone (GH), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and insulin (INS) have been shown to have a positive effect on it. Bacterial translocation (BT) is frequent after extensive small bowel resection, but the effects of GH, EGF, or INS have not been investigated in experimental short bowel syndrome (SBS). This study tests the hypothesis that GH, EGF, or INS decrease BT in SBS in rats with parenteral nutrition (PN). METHODS: Thirty-eight adult Wistar rats underwent central venous cannulation and were assigned randomly to 1 of 4 groups receiving for 10 days 4 treatment regimes: (1) PN group (n = 10): fasting, all-in-one PN solution (300 mL/kg/24 h, 280 kcal/kg/24 h), 80% gut resection including ileo-cecal valve; (2) GH group (n = 9): fasting, same PN regime and resection, GH (1 mg/kg/d, subcutaneously); (3) EGF group (n = 9): fasting, PN, resection, EGF (150 microg/24 h intravenously); (4) INS group (n = 9): fasting, PN, resection, INS (1 UI/100 g/24 h subcutaneously). At the end of the experiment they were killed, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and peripheral and portal blood samples were recovered and cultured. Several fragments of intestine were taken to determine cell proliferation (PCNA index) and morphometric parameters (villous height, crypt depth). RESULTS: GH, EGF, and INS groups showed a 28%, 29%, and 30% increase in gut mucosal thickness, and PCNA index rose 21%, 20%, and 25%, respectively in comparison with PN controls. Bacterial translocation to peripheral blood was detected in 0% of PN animals and in 44%, 40%, and 28% of GH, EGF, or INS rats, respectively (P < .05). No differences were found in BT in MLN or portal blood among groups. CONCLUSION: Administration of GH, EGF, or INS improves gut mucosal structure in rats with SBS under PN, but, surprisingly, the incidence of BT detected in peripheral blood was increased rather than decreased in animals receiving these treatments. SN - 0022-3468 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10813326/Effect_of_growth_hormone_epidermal_growth_factor_and_insulin_on_bacterial_translocation_in_experimental_short_bowel_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3468(00)87077-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -