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Treatment of cutaneous larva migrans.
Clin Infect Dis. 2000 May; 30(5):811-4.CI

Abstract

Cutaneous larva migrans caused by the larvae of animal hookworms is the most frequent skin disease among travelers returning from tropical countries. Complications (impetigo and allergic reactions), together with the intense pruritus and the significant duration of the disease, make treatment mandatory. Freezing the leading edge of the skin track rarely works. Topical treatment of the affected area with 10%-15% thiabendazole solution or ointment has limited value for multiple lesions and hookworm folliculitis, and requires applications 3 times a day for at least 15 days. Oral thiabendazole is poorly effective when given as a single dose (cure rate, 68%-84%) and is less well tolerated than either albendazole or ivermectin. Treatment with a single 400-mg oral dose of albendazole gives cure rates of 46%-100%; a single 12-mg oral dose of ivermectin gives cure rates of 81%-100%.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service des Maladies Infectieuses et Tropicales, Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France. egcaumes@cybercable.fr

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10816151

Citation

Caumes, E. "Treatment of Cutaneous Larva Migrans." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 30, no. 5, 2000, pp. 811-4.
Caumes E. Treatment of cutaneous larva migrans. Clin Infect Dis. 2000;30(5):811-4.
Caumes, E. (2000). Treatment of cutaneous larva migrans. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 30(5), 811-4.
Caumes E. Treatment of Cutaneous Larva Migrans. Clin Infect Dis. 2000;30(5):811-4. PubMed PMID: 10816151.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Treatment of cutaneous larva migrans. A1 - Caumes,E, Y1 - 2000/05/18/ PY - 1999/11/22/received PY - 2000/5/18/pubmed PY - 2000/8/29/medline PY - 2000/5/18/entrez SP - 811 EP - 4 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin. Infect. Dis. VL - 30 IS - 5 N2 - Cutaneous larva migrans caused by the larvae of animal hookworms is the most frequent skin disease among travelers returning from tropical countries. Complications (impetigo and allergic reactions), together with the intense pruritus and the significant duration of the disease, make treatment mandatory. Freezing the leading edge of the skin track rarely works. Topical treatment of the affected area with 10%-15% thiabendazole solution or ointment has limited value for multiple lesions and hookworm folliculitis, and requires applications 3 times a day for at least 15 days. Oral thiabendazole is poorly effective when given as a single dose (cure rate, 68%-84%) and is less well tolerated than either albendazole or ivermectin. Treatment with a single 400-mg oral dose of albendazole gives cure rates of 46%-100%; a single 12-mg oral dose of ivermectin gives cure rates of 81%-100%. SN - 1058-4838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10816151/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/313787 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -