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The role of the sand in chemical warfare agent exposure among Persian Gulf War veterans: Al Eskan disease and "dirty dust".
Mil Med. 2000 May; 165(5):321-36.MM

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to inquire into the relationship between Al Eskan disease and the probable exposure to chemical warfare agents by Persian Gulf War veterans. Al Eskan disease, first reported in 1991, compromises the body's immunological defense and is a result of the pathogenic properties of the extremely fine, dusty sand located in the central and eastern region of the Arabian peninsula. The disease manifests with localized expression of multisystem disorder. Signs and symptoms of Al Eskan disease have been termed by the news media "Persian Gulf syndrome." The dust becomes a warfare agent when toxic chemicals are microimpregnated into inert particles. The "dirty dust" concept, that the toxicity of an agent could be enhanced by absorption into inactive particles, dates from World War I. A growing body of evidence shows that coalition forces have encountered Iraqi chemical warfare in the theater of operation/Persian Gulf War to a much greater extent than early U.S. Department of Defense information had indicated. Veterans of that war were exposed to chemical warfare agents in the form of direct (deliberate) attacks by chemical weapons, such as missiles and mines, and indirect (accidental) contamination from demolished munition production plants and storage areas, or otherwise. We conclude that the microimpregnated sand particles in the theater of operation/Persian Gulf War depleted the immune system and simultaneously acted as vehicles for low-intensity exposure to chemical warfare agents and had a modifying-intensifying effect on the toxicity of exposed individuals. We recommend recognition of a new term, "dirty sand," as a subcategory of dirty dust/dusty chemical warfare agents. Our ongoing research efforts to investigate the health impact of chemical warfare agent exposure among Persian Gulf War veterans suggest that Al Eskan disease is a plausible and preeminent explanation for the preponderance of Persian Gulf War illnesses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Hungarian Home Defense Forces, Hungary.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10826378

Citation

Korényi-Both, A L., et al. "The Role of the Sand in Chemical Warfare Agent Exposure Among Persian Gulf War Veterans: Al Eskan Disease and "dirty Dust"." Military Medicine, vol. 165, no. 5, 2000, pp. 321-36.
Korényi-Both AL, Svéd L, Korényi-Both GE, et al. The role of the sand in chemical warfare agent exposure among Persian Gulf War veterans: Al Eskan disease and "dirty dust". Mil Med. 2000;165(5):321-36.
Korényi-Both, A. L., Svéd, L., Korényi-Both, G. E., Juncer, D. J., Korényi-Both, A. L., & Székely, A. (2000). The role of the sand in chemical warfare agent exposure among Persian Gulf War veterans: Al Eskan disease and "dirty dust". Military Medicine, 165(5), 321-36.
Korényi-Both AL, et al. The Role of the Sand in Chemical Warfare Agent Exposure Among Persian Gulf War Veterans: Al Eskan Disease and "dirty Dust". Mil Med. 2000;165(5):321-36. PubMed PMID: 10826378.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of the sand in chemical warfare agent exposure among Persian Gulf War veterans: Al Eskan disease and "dirty dust". AU - Korényi-Both,A L, AU - Svéd,L, AU - Korényi-Both,G E, AU - Juncer,D J, AU - Korényi-Both,A L, AU - Székely,A, PY - 2000/5/29/pubmed PY - 2000/6/10/medline PY - 2000/5/29/entrez SP - 321 EP - 36 JF - Military medicine JO - Mil Med VL - 165 IS - 5 N2 - The purpose of this paper is to inquire into the relationship between Al Eskan disease and the probable exposure to chemical warfare agents by Persian Gulf War veterans. Al Eskan disease, first reported in 1991, compromises the body's immunological defense and is a result of the pathogenic properties of the extremely fine, dusty sand located in the central and eastern region of the Arabian peninsula. The disease manifests with localized expression of multisystem disorder. Signs and symptoms of Al Eskan disease have been termed by the news media "Persian Gulf syndrome." The dust becomes a warfare agent when toxic chemicals are microimpregnated into inert particles. The "dirty dust" concept, that the toxicity of an agent could be enhanced by absorption into inactive particles, dates from World War I. A growing body of evidence shows that coalition forces have encountered Iraqi chemical warfare in the theater of operation/Persian Gulf War to a much greater extent than early U.S. Department of Defense information had indicated. Veterans of that war were exposed to chemical warfare agents in the form of direct (deliberate) attacks by chemical weapons, such as missiles and mines, and indirect (accidental) contamination from demolished munition production plants and storage areas, or otherwise. We conclude that the microimpregnated sand particles in the theater of operation/Persian Gulf War depleted the immune system and simultaneously acted as vehicles for low-intensity exposure to chemical warfare agents and had a modifying-intensifying effect on the toxicity of exposed individuals. We recommend recognition of a new term, "dirty sand," as a subcategory of dirty dust/dusty chemical warfare agents. Our ongoing research efforts to investigate the health impact of chemical warfare agent exposure among Persian Gulf War veterans suggest that Al Eskan disease is a plausible and preeminent explanation for the preponderance of Persian Gulf War illnesses. SN - 0026-4075 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10826378/The_role_of_the_sand_in_chemical_warfare_agent_exposure_among_Persian_Gulf_War_veterans:_Al_Eskan_disease_and_"dirty_dust"_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/chemicalemergencies.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -