Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The relationship of childhood adiposity to parent body mass index and eating behavior.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To better understand risk factors for the development of obesity in early childhood, we examined the association between children's adiposity and their parents' eating behavior and body mass index (BMI).

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Parents of 85 white children 36 months of age (49 boys and 36 girls) completed the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire measuring three dimensions of parent eating behavior: disinhibited eating, cognitive restraint of eating, and susceptibility to hunger. Parent BMI (kg/m2) was calculated using self-reported height and weight. The children's percentage body fat was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis.

RESULTS

Twenty-six percent of parents were obese (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2). Both maternal and paternal BMI were associated with higher scores for disinhibition (r = 0.69 and r = 0.68, p < 0.001), and maternal BMI was also associated with higher scores for hunger (r = 0.51, p < 0.001). There were no significant relationships between children's percentage body fat and parent eating scores, and the correlation between children's percentage body fat and parent BMI was significant only between mothers and daughters (r = 0.35, p = 0.04). Obese parents were no more likely to have a child who was fatter (upper quintile of percentage body fat for gender).

DISCUSSION

Among 36 month-old white children, parent eating behavior was related to parent BMI, but not to children's adiposity. There was only a weak relationship between parent BMI and child adiposity. Despite the aggregation of adiposity within families due to shared genes and environments, children may not express differences in susceptibility to obesity by 3 years of age.

Links

  • FREE Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of General and Community Pediatrics, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, USA. bobwhit@chmcc.org

    , ,

    Source

    Obesity research 8:3 2000 May pg 234-40

    MeSH

    Absorptiometry, Photon
    Adipose Tissue
    Adult
    Body Composition
    Body Mass Index
    Child, Preschool
    Cohort Studies
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Educational Status
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Obesity
    Statistics, Nonparametric
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10832766

    Citation

    Whitaker, R C., et al. "The Relationship of Childhood Adiposity to Parent Body Mass Index and Eating Behavior." Obesity Research, vol. 8, no. 3, 2000, pp. 234-40.
    Whitaker RC, Deeks CM, Baughcum AE, et al. The relationship of childhood adiposity to parent body mass index and eating behavior. Obes Res. 2000;8(3):234-40.
    Whitaker, R. C., Deeks, C. M., Baughcum, A. E., & Specker, B. L. (2000). The relationship of childhood adiposity to parent body mass index and eating behavior. Obesity Research, 8(3), pp. 234-40.
    Whitaker RC, et al. The Relationship of Childhood Adiposity to Parent Body Mass Index and Eating Behavior. Obes Res. 2000;8(3):234-40. PubMed PMID: 10832766.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship of childhood adiposity to parent body mass index and eating behavior. AU - Whitaker,R C, AU - Deeks,C M, AU - Baughcum,A E, AU - Specker,B L, PY - 2000/6/1/pubmed PY - 2000/9/23/medline PY - 2000/6/1/entrez SP - 234 EP - 40 JF - Obesity research JO - Obes. Res. VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To better understand risk factors for the development of obesity in early childhood, we examined the association between children's adiposity and their parents' eating behavior and body mass index (BMI). RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Parents of 85 white children 36 months of age (49 boys and 36 girls) completed the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire measuring three dimensions of parent eating behavior: disinhibited eating, cognitive restraint of eating, and susceptibility to hunger. Parent BMI (kg/m2) was calculated using self-reported height and weight. The children's percentage body fat was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis. RESULTS: Twenty-six percent of parents were obese (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2). Both maternal and paternal BMI were associated with higher scores for disinhibition (r = 0.69 and r = 0.68, p < 0.001), and maternal BMI was also associated with higher scores for hunger (r = 0.51, p < 0.001). There were no significant relationships between children's percentage body fat and parent eating scores, and the correlation between children's percentage body fat and parent BMI was significant only between mothers and daughters (r = 0.35, p = 0.04). Obese parents were no more likely to have a child who was fatter (upper quintile of percentage body fat for gender). DISCUSSION: Among 36 month-old white children, parent eating behavior was related to parent BMI, but not to children's adiposity. There was only a weak relationship between parent BMI and child adiposity. Despite the aggregation of adiposity within families due to shared genes and environments, children may not express differences in susceptibility to obesity by 3 years of age. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10832766/The_relationship_of_childhood_adiposity_to_parent_body_mass_index_and_eating_behavior_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2000.27 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -