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Childhood deaths and injuries in Finland in 1971-1995.
Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Jun; 29(3):516-23.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

This study examined the recent nationwide trends for the absolute number and the age- and sex-specific incidence rates of the fatal and serious non-fatal injuries among 0-14 year old children in Finland in 1971-1995.

METHODS

We selected from Official Cause-of-Death Statistics and National Hospital Discharge Register children aged 0-14 years who died or required treatment at a hospital department because of an injury in 1971-1995. The number of Finnish children was 1.1 million in 1971, and 1.0 million in 1995.

RESULTS

During the entire study period injuries were the leading cause of death in children aged 1-14 years, but not in infants. However, in these years the incidence (per 100 000 people) of fatal injuries in Finnish children decreased considerably in all age groups and both sexes, in girls from 20.1 in 1971 to 4.6 in 1995, and in boys from 36.7 in 1971 to 9.3 in 1995. In 1995, 41% of all the injurious deaths among 0-14 year old Finnish children were motor vehicle accidents, 12% were drownings, and 24% intentional injuries. The overall number and incidence of serious non-fatal injuries among Finnish children showed no clear trend change in 1971-1995. The mean hospitalization time of injured children shortened between 1971 and 1995, from 7.4 days to 2.7 days.

CONCLUSIONS

We conclude that the number and incidence of fatal childhood injuries have decreased dramatically in Finland between 1971 and 1995. The reasons for this positive development are multifactorial, but improved traffic safety and trauma care are probably very important. In children's serious non-fatal injuries the development has not been so encouraging and therefore children's injury prevention should receive continuous intense attention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Accident & Trauma Research Centre, UKK Institute for Health Promotion Research, Tampere, Finland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10869325

Citation

Parkkari, J, et al. "Childhood Deaths and Injuries in Finland in 1971-1995." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 29, no. 3, 2000, pp. 516-23.
Parkkari J, Kannus P, Niemi S, et al. Childhood deaths and injuries in Finland in 1971-1995. Int J Epidemiol. 2000;29(3):516-23.
Parkkari, J., Kannus, P., Niemi, S., Koskinen, S., Palvanen, M., Vuori, I., & Järvinen, M. (2000). Childhood deaths and injuries in Finland in 1971-1995. International Journal of Epidemiology, 29(3), 516-23.
Parkkari J, et al. Childhood Deaths and Injuries in Finland in 1971-1995. Int J Epidemiol. 2000;29(3):516-23. PubMed PMID: 10869325.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Childhood deaths and injuries in Finland in 1971-1995. AU - Parkkari,J, AU - Kannus,P, AU - Niemi,S, AU - Koskinen,S, AU - Palvanen,M, AU - Vuori,I, AU - Järvinen,M, PY - 2000/6/28/pubmed PY - 2000/10/7/medline PY - 2000/6/28/entrez SP - 516 EP - 23 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 29 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: This study examined the recent nationwide trends for the absolute number and the age- and sex-specific incidence rates of the fatal and serious non-fatal injuries among 0-14 year old children in Finland in 1971-1995. METHODS: We selected from Official Cause-of-Death Statistics and National Hospital Discharge Register children aged 0-14 years who died or required treatment at a hospital department because of an injury in 1971-1995. The number of Finnish children was 1.1 million in 1971, and 1.0 million in 1995. RESULTS: During the entire study period injuries were the leading cause of death in children aged 1-14 years, but not in infants. However, in these years the incidence (per 100 000 people) of fatal injuries in Finnish children decreased considerably in all age groups and both sexes, in girls from 20.1 in 1971 to 4.6 in 1995, and in boys from 36.7 in 1971 to 9.3 in 1995. In 1995, 41% of all the injurious deaths among 0-14 year old Finnish children were motor vehicle accidents, 12% were drownings, and 24% intentional injuries. The overall number and incidence of serious non-fatal injuries among Finnish children showed no clear trend change in 1971-1995. The mean hospitalization time of injured children shortened between 1971 and 1995, from 7.4 days to 2.7 days. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the number and incidence of fatal childhood injuries have decreased dramatically in Finland between 1971 and 1995. The reasons for this positive development are multifactorial, but improved traffic safety and trauma care are probably very important. In children's serious non-fatal injuries the development has not been so encouraging and therefore children's injury prevention should receive continuous intense attention. SN - 0300-5771 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10869325/Childhood_deaths_and_injuries_in_Finland_in_1971_1995_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/woundsandinjuries.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -