Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Calcium, vitamin D, sunshine exposure, dairy products and colon cancer risk (United States).
Cancer Causes Control 2000; 11(5):459-66CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Epidemiologic studies on calcium, vitamin D and colon cancer are inconsistent, whereas experimental studies more regularly show a protective effect. To evaluate potential sources of inconsistencies, data from a large case-control study were analyzed, stratifying on potential effect modifiers.

METHODS

Data were collected by certified interviewers in Northern California, Utah and Minnesota. Analyses included 1993 incident colon cancer cases and 2410 population-based controls. Multivariate logistic regression models included age, sex, BMI, family history, physical activity, intake of energy, dietary fiber, aspirin and NSAIDs.

RESULTS

Dietary calcium was inversely associated with colon cancer risk in men (OR highest vs lowest quintile = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.5-0.9) and women (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4-0.9). No statistically significant associations were observed for dietary vitamin D or sunshine exposure. Consumption of total low-fat dairy products was associated with a statistically significantly decreased risk in men and women (ORs highest vs lowest category of intake = 0.8 and 0.7 respectively). Calcium supplement use was inversely associated with risk in both sexes (ORs use vs non-use = 0.8). Vitamin D supplements were inversely associated with risk in men (OR = 0.5) and women (OR = 0.6) but confidence limits included 1.0.

CONCLUSIONS

These data provide additional support of an inverse association between high levels of calcium intake and colon cancer risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Cancer Prevention Research Program, Seattle, WA 98109-1024, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10877339

Citation

Kampman, E, et al. "Calcium, Vitamin D, Sunshine Exposure, Dairy Products and Colon Cancer Risk (United States)." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 11, no. 5, 2000, pp. 459-66.
Kampman E, Slattery ML, Caan B, et al. Calcium, vitamin D, sunshine exposure, dairy products and colon cancer risk (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2000;11(5):459-66.
Kampman, E., Slattery, M. L., Caan, B., & Potter, J. D. (2000). Calcium, vitamin D, sunshine exposure, dairy products and colon cancer risk (United States). Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 11(5), pp. 459-66.
Kampman E, et al. Calcium, Vitamin D, Sunshine Exposure, Dairy Products and Colon Cancer Risk (United States). Cancer Causes Control. 2000;11(5):459-66. PubMed PMID: 10877339.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Calcium, vitamin D, sunshine exposure, dairy products and colon cancer risk (United States). AU - Kampman,E, AU - Slattery,M L, AU - Caan,B, AU - Potter,J D, PY - 2000/7/6/pubmed PY - 2000/10/21/medline PY - 2000/7/6/entrez SP - 459 EP - 66 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 11 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Epidemiologic studies on calcium, vitamin D and colon cancer are inconsistent, whereas experimental studies more regularly show a protective effect. To evaluate potential sources of inconsistencies, data from a large case-control study were analyzed, stratifying on potential effect modifiers. METHODS: Data were collected by certified interviewers in Northern California, Utah and Minnesota. Analyses included 1993 incident colon cancer cases and 2410 population-based controls. Multivariate logistic regression models included age, sex, BMI, family history, physical activity, intake of energy, dietary fiber, aspirin and NSAIDs. RESULTS: Dietary calcium was inversely associated with colon cancer risk in men (OR highest vs lowest quintile = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.5-0.9) and women (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.4-0.9). No statistically significant associations were observed for dietary vitamin D or sunshine exposure. Consumption of total low-fat dairy products was associated with a statistically significantly decreased risk in men and women (ORs highest vs lowest category of intake = 0.8 and 0.7 respectively). Calcium supplement use was inversely associated with risk in both sexes (ORs use vs non-use = 0.8). Vitamin D supplements were inversely associated with risk in men (OR = 0.5) and women (OR = 0.6) but confidence limits included 1.0. CONCLUSIONS: These data provide additional support of an inverse association between high levels of calcium intake and colon cancer risk. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10877339/Calcium_vitamin_D_sunshine_exposure_dairy_products_and_colon_cancer_risk__United_States__ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=10877339.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -