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Control of food-borne viruses.
Br Med Bull. 2000; 56(1):172-83.BM

Abstract

There are two main food-borne virus infections. These are viral gastroenteritis caused by small round structured viruses (SRSV) of the Norwalk group and hepatitis A. Both infections are normally transmitted directly from person-to-person, but on occasions they may also be food-borne or water-borne. Viruses do not multiply or produce toxins in foods, and foods merely act as vehicles for their passive transfer. Foods may be contaminated by infected food-handlers, and outbreaks frequently involve cold foods that require much handling during preparation. Foods may also be contaminated in their growing and harvesting areas by sewage polluted water, and molluscan shellfish have been particularly implicated. PCR and ELISA based methods are being developed for detection and typing of viruses in patients and also in food samples. Sensitive detection methods should facilitate the design of improved food processing methods to ensure virus-free food.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Enteric and Respiratory Virus Laboratory, Central Public Health Laboratory, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10885114

Citation

Appleton, H. "Control of Food-borne Viruses." British Medical Bulletin, vol. 56, no. 1, 2000, pp. 172-83.
Appleton H. Control of food-borne viruses. Br Med Bull. 2000;56(1):172-83.
Appleton, H. (2000). Control of food-borne viruses. British Medical Bulletin, 56(1), 172-83.
Appleton H. Control of Food-borne Viruses. Br Med Bull. 2000;56(1):172-83. PubMed PMID: 10885114.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Control of food-borne viruses. A1 - Appleton,H, PY - 2000/7/8/pubmed PY - 2000/7/25/medline PY - 2000/7/8/entrez SP - 172 EP - 83 JF - British medical bulletin JO - Br Med Bull VL - 56 IS - 1 N2 - There are two main food-borne virus infections. These are viral gastroenteritis caused by small round structured viruses (SRSV) of the Norwalk group and hepatitis A. Both infections are normally transmitted directly from person-to-person, but on occasions they may also be food-borne or water-borne. Viruses do not multiply or produce toxins in foods, and foods merely act as vehicles for their passive transfer. Foods may be contaminated by infected food-handlers, and outbreaks frequently involve cold foods that require much handling during preparation. Foods may also be contaminated in their growing and harvesting areas by sewage polluted water, and molluscan shellfish have been particularly implicated. PCR and ELISA based methods are being developed for detection and typing of viruses in patients and also in food samples. Sensitive detection methods should facilitate the design of improved food processing methods to ensure virus-free food. SN - 0007-1420 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10885114/Control_of_food_borne_viruses_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/bmb/article-lookup/doi/10.1258/0007142001902879 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -