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Blood lead and hemoglobin levels in Andean children with chronic lead intoxication.
Neurotoxicology. 2000 Jun; 21(3):301-8.N

Abstract

This study investigated blood lead (PbB) and hemoglobin (HbB) levels in 88 children (42 females and 46 males; ages: 2-15 years; mean age: 7.2) with chronic Pb exposure, living in a highly Pb-contaminated Andean village at above 2800 meters. The mean PbB level for 88 venous blood samples was 43.2 microg/dl (SD: 25.1; range: 6.2 - 128.2 microg/dl) measured by ICP-MS, and 42.0 microg/dl (SD: 26.0; range: 5.0 - 130.0 microg/dl) by GFAAS analysis. The mean PbB level for the 42 females was 41.0 microg/dl and for 46 males, 45.0 microg/dl. Multiple regression analysis showed a significant gender by age interaction (R2 = 0.099; F = 4.173, p = 0.044), indicating a relationship between age and PbB level for males, but not for females. Simple regression analysis showed a statistically significant positive correlation between PbB levels and age for males (r = 0.416, p = 0.004), but not for females (r = -0.042, p = .793). The measured mean HbB level for the 88 children was 12.6 g/dl (12.5 g/dl for females and 12.8 g/dl for males) and lower than expected for children living in the Ecuadorian Andes. The mean altitude-corrected HbB level was 10.9 g/dl (10.8 g/dl for females and 11.1 g/dl for males). A significant inverse correlation between PbB and HbB levels was observed for the group of 88 children (r = -0.292, p = 0.006). Multiple regression analyses indicated no significant age and gender interaction (R2 = 0.014; F = 0.025, p = 0.876) for HbB levels. In conclusion, the results of this investigation indicate that the children in this Pb-contaminated, high altitude study area had chronic elevated PbB levels, which increased with age for males, and probable Pb-induced anemia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology/Biological Laboratories, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. allen_counter@harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10894119

Citation

Counter, S A., et al. "Blood Lead and Hemoglobin Levels in Andean Children With Chronic Lead Intoxication." Neurotoxicology, vol. 21, no. 3, 2000, pp. 301-8.
Counter SA, Buchanan LH, Ortega F, et al. Blood lead and hemoglobin levels in Andean children with chronic lead intoxication. Neurotoxicology. 2000;21(3):301-8.
Counter, S. A., Buchanan, L. H., Ortega, F., & Rifai, N. (2000). Blood lead and hemoglobin levels in Andean children with chronic lead intoxication. Neurotoxicology, 21(3), 301-8.
Counter SA, et al. Blood Lead and Hemoglobin Levels in Andean Children With Chronic Lead Intoxication. Neurotoxicology. 2000;21(3):301-8. PubMed PMID: 10894119.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blood lead and hemoglobin levels in Andean children with chronic lead intoxication. AU - Counter,S A, AU - Buchanan,L H, AU - Ortega,F, AU - Rifai,N, PY - 2000/7/14/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/7/14/entrez SP - 301 EP - 8 JF - Neurotoxicology JO - Neurotoxicology VL - 21 IS - 3 N2 - This study investigated blood lead (PbB) and hemoglobin (HbB) levels in 88 children (42 females and 46 males; ages: 2-15 years; mean age: 7.2) with chronic Pb exposure, living in a highly Pb-contaminated Andean village at above 2800 meters. The mean PbB level for 88 venous blood samples was 43.2 microg/dl (SD: 25.1; range: 6.2 - 128.2 microg/dl) measured by ICP-MS, and 42.0 microg/dl (SD: 26.0; range: 5.0 - 130.0 microg/dl) by GFAAS analysis. The mean PbB level for the 42 females was 41.0 microg/dl and for 46 males, 45.0 microg/dl. Multiple regression analysis showed a significant gender by age interaction (R2 = 0.099; F = 4.173, p = 0.044), indicating a relationship between age and PbB level for males, but not for females. Simple regression analysis showed a statistically significant positive correlation between PbB levels and age for males (r = 0.416, p = 0.004), but not for females (r = -0.042, p = .793). The measured mean HbB level for the 88 children was 12.6 g/dl (12.5 g/dl for females and 12.8 g/dl for males) and lower than expected for children living in the Ecuadorian Andes. The mean altitude-corrected HbB level was 10.9 g/dl (10.8 g/dl for females and 11.1 g/dl for males). A significant inverse correlation between PbB and HbB levels was observed for the group of 88 children (r = -0.292, p = 0.006). Multiple regression analyses indicated no significant age and gender interaction (R2 = 0.014; F = 0.025, p = 0.876) for HbB levels. In conclusion, the results of this investigation indicate that the children in this Pb-contaminated, high altitude study area had chronic elevated PbB levels, which increased with age for males, and probable Pb-induced anemia. SN - 0161-813X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10894119/Blood_lead_and_hemoglobin_levels_in_Andean_children_with_chronic_lead_intoxication_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/leadpoisoning.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -