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Renal amino acid metabolism during endotoxemia in the rat.
J Surg Res. 2000 Aug; 92(2):193-200.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The kidney has an important function in the exchange of nitrogenous metabolites. Glutamine is the most important substrate for renal ammoniagenesis and thus plays a crucial role in acid-base homeostasis. Furthermore, the kidney is the main endogenous source for de novo arginine production from citrulline, which in turn is derived from intestinal glutamine metabolism. Sepsis is a condition in which glutamine availability is reduced, whereas the need for arginine biosynthesis may be increased. Limited bioavailability of glutamine may affect arginine synthesis, which may have consequences for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Therefore, we studied renal glutamine and arginine metabolism in a rat model of endotoxemia and related this to NO metabolism.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Rats were subject to double hit endotoxemia, and control rats received 0.9% NaCl. Renal blood flow was measured using para-aminohippuric acid. Concentrations of plasma amino acids and nitrate were measured in the aorta and renal vein to calculate net renal uptake or release of amino acids and address NO production.

RESULTS

The arterial concentrations of glutamine and ammonia were not changed in endotoxemic rats. Although renal glutamine uptake was reduced, total renal ammonia production was not changed during endotoxemia. The arterial concentration of citrulline and renal citrulline uptake was not altered in endotoxin-treated rats, but renal arginine production was increased. However, no effect was observed on nitric oxide production.

CONCLUSIONS

Although the kidney has very important functions in the excretion of waste products and in interorgan metabolism, this study suggests that the kidney has a limited role in glutamine, arginine, and NO metabolism during late endotoxemia in rats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10896821

Citation

Hallemeesch, M M., et al. "Renal Amino Acid Metabolism During Endotoxemia in the Rat." The Journal of Surgical Research, vol. 92, no. 2, 2000, pp. 193-200.
Hallemeesch MM, Cobben DC, Dejong CH, et al. Renal amino acid metabolism during endotoxemia in the rat. J Surg Res. 2000;92(2):193-200.
Hallemeesch, M. M., Cobben, D. C., Dejong, C. H., Soeters, P. B., & Deutz, N. E. (2000). Renal amino acid metabolism during endotoxemia in the rat. The Journal of Surgical Research, 92(2), 193-200.
Hallemeesch MM, et al. Renal Amino Acid Metabolism During Endotoxemia in the Rat. J Surg Res. 2000;92(2):193-200. PubMed PMID: 10896821.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Renal amino acid metabolism during endotoxemia in the rat. AU - Hallemeesch,M M, AU - Cobben,D C, AU - Dejong,C H, AU - Soeters,P B, AU - Deutz,N E, PY - 2000/7/18/pubmed PY - 2000/8/19/medline PY - 2000/7/18/entrez SP - 193 EP - 200 JF - The Journal of surgical research JO - J Surg Res VL - 92 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: The kidney has an important function in the exchange of nitrogenous metabolites. Glutamine is the most important substrate for renal ammoniagenesis and thus plays a crucial role in acid-base homeostasis. Furthermore, the kidney is the main endogenous source for de novo arginine production from citrulline, which in turn is derived from intestinal glutamine metabolism. Sepsis is a condition in which glutamine availability is reduced, whereas the need for arginine biosynthesis may be increased. Limited bioavailability of glutamine may affect arginine synthesis, which may have consequences for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Therefore, we studied renal glutamine and arginine metabolism in a rat model of endotoxemia and related this to NO metabolism. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rats were subject to double hit endotoxemia, and control rats received 0.9% NaCl. Renal blood flow was measured using para-aminohippuric acid. Concentrations of plasma amino acids and nitrate were measured in the aorta and renal vein to calculate net renal uptake or release of amino acids and address NO production. RESULTS: The arterial concentrations of glutamine and ammonia were not changed in endotoxemic rats. Although renal glutamine uptake was reduced, total renal ammonia production was not changed during endotoxemia. The arterial concentration of citrulline and renal citrulline uptake was not altered in endotoxin-treated rats, but renal arginine production was increased. However, no effect was observed on nitric oxide production. CONCLUSIONS: Although the kidney has very important functions in the excretion of waste products and in interorgan metabolism, this study suggests that the kidney has a limited role in glutamine, arginine, and NO metabolism during late endotoxemia in rats. SN - 0022-4804 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10896821/Renal_amino_acid_metabolism_during_endotoxemia_in_the_rat_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-4804(00)95867-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -