Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Bisphosphonates in the management of prostate carcinoma metastatic to the skeleton.
Cancer. 2000 Jun 15; 88(12 Suppl):3047-53.C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prostate carcinoma metastasizes frequently to the skeleton, causing significant morbidity, particularly severe bone pain. Metastatic lesions typically are osteosclerotic, but there is experimental, histologic, and biochemical evidence of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, bone resorption rates appear to correlate with bone pain. These observations provide the rationale for the use of bisphosphonates in the management of patients with prostate carcinoma and skeletal metastases.

METHODS

The authors reviewed the literature and current findings on the use of biphosphonates in the management of patients with prostate carcinoma metastatic to the skeleton.

RESULTS

Compared with the large number of studies with bisphosphonates in predominantly osteolytic bone disease, there have been relatively few (mostly uncontrolled) studies in patients with prostate carcinoma. Apart from the lack of appropriate experimental models, the osteoblastic nature of the metastases and the low incidence of objectively assessed endpoints of treatment (e.g., hypercalcemia, pathologic fractures) have delayed developments. Available data, however, strongly suggest that potent bisphosphonates are efficacious in reducing skeletal morbidity in patients with prostate carcinoma.

CONCLUSIONS

For the optimal management of patients with skeletal metastases from prostate carcinoma with bisphosphonates their mode of administration, the dose and duration of treatment need to be evaluated. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying bone metastases can lead to the design of improved treatment protocols with potent bisphosphonates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Leiden University Medical Center, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10898350

Citation

Papapoulos, S E., et al. "Bisphosphonates in the Management of Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic to the Skeleton." Cancer, vol. 88, no. 12 Suppl, 2000, pp. 3047-53.
Papapoulos SE, Hamdy NA, van der Pluijm G. Bisphosphonates in the management of prostate carcinoma metastatic to the skeleton. Cancer. 2000;88(12 Suppl):3047-53.
Papapoulos, S. E., Hamdy, N. A., & van der Pluijm, G. (2000). Bisphosphonates in the management of prostate carcinoma metastatic to the skeleton. Cancer, 88(12 Suppl), 3047-53.
Papapoulos SE, Hamdy NA, van der Pluijm G. Bisphosphonates in the Management of Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic to the Skeleton. Cancer. 2000 Jun 15;88(12 Suppl):3047-53. PubMed PMID: 10898350.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bisphosphonates in the management of prostate carcinoma metastatic to the skeleton. AU - Papapoulos,S E, AU - Hamdy,N A, AU - van der Pluijm,G, PY - 2000/7/18/pubmed PY - 2000/8/1/medline PY - 2000/7/18/entrez SP - 3047 EP - 53 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 88 IS - 12 Suppl N2 - BACKGROUND: Prostate carcinoma metastasizes frequently to the skeleton, causing significant morbidity, particularly severe bone pain. Metastatic lesions typically are osteosclerotic, but there is experimental, histologic, and biochemical evidence of increased bone resorption. Furthermore, bone resorption rates appear to correlate with bone pain. These observations provide the rationale for the use of bisphosphonates in the management of patients with prostate carcinoma and skeletal metastases. METHODS: The authors reviewed the literature and current findings on the use of biphosphonates in the management of patients with prostate carcinoma metastatic to the skeleton. RESULTS: Compared with the large number of studies with bisphosphonates in predominantly osteolytic bone disease, there have been relatively few (mostly uncontrolled) studies in patients with prostate carcinoma. Apart from the lack of appropriate experimental models, the osteoblastic nature of the metastases and the low incidence of objectively assessed endpoints of treatment (e.g., hypercalcemia, pathologic fractures) have delayed developments. Available data, however, strongly suggest that potent bisphosphonates are efficacious in reducing skeletal morbidity in patients with prostate carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: For the optimal management of patients with skeletal metastases from prostate carcinoma with bisphosphonates their mode of administration, the dose and duration of treatment need to be evaluated. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying bone metastases can lead to the design of improved treatment protocols with potent bisphosphonates. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10898350/Bisphosphonates_in_the_management_of_prostate_carcinoma_metastatic_to_the_skeleton_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/bonecancer.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -