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Spinal nerve injury enhances subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in DRG neurons: relation to neuropathic pain.
J Neurophysiol. 2000 Jul; 84(1):205-15.JN

Abstract

Primary sensory neurons with myelinated axons were examined in vitro in excised whole lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) taken from adult rats up to 9 days after tight ligation and transection of the L(5) spinal nerve (Chung model of neuropathic pain). Properties of subthreshold membrane potential oscillations, and of repetitive spike discharge, were examined. About 5% of the DRG neurons sampled in control DRGs exhibited high-frequency, subthreshold sinusoidal oscillations in their membrane potential at rest (V(r)), and an additional 4.4% developed such oscillations on depolarization. Virtually all had noninflected action potentials (A(0) neurons). Amplitude and frequency of subthreshold oscillations were voltage sensitive. A(0) neurons with oscillations at V(r) appear to constitute a population distinct from A(0) neurons that oscillate only on depolarization. Axotomy triggered a significant increase in the proportion of neurons exhibiting subthreshold oscillations both at V(r) and on depolarization. This change occurred within a narrow time window 16-24 h postoperative. Axotomy also shifted the membrane potential at which oscillation amplitude was maximal to more negative (hyperpolarized) values, and lowered oscillation frequency at any given membrane potential. Most neurons that had oscillations at V(r), or that developed them on depolarization, began to fire repetitively when further depolarized. Spikes were triggered by the depolarizing phase of oscillatory sinusoids. Neurons that did not develop subthreshold oscillations never discharged repetitively and rarely fired more than a single spike or a short burst, on step depolarization. The most prominent spike waveform parameters distinguishing neurons capable of generating subthreshold oscillations, and hence repetitive firing, was their brief postspike afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and their low single-spike threshold. Neurons that oscillated at V(r) tended to have a more prolonged spike, with slower rise- and fall-time kinetics, and lower spike threshold, than cells that oscillated only on depolarization. The main effects of axotomy were to increase spike duration, slow rise- and fall-time kinetics, and reduce single-spike threshold. Tactile allodynia following spinal nerve injury is thought to result from central amplification ("central sensitization") of afferent signals entering the spinal cord from residual intact afferents. The central sensitization, in turn, is thought to be triggered and maintained in the Chung model by ectopic firing originating in the axotomized afferent neurons. Axotomy by spinal nerve injury enhances subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in DRG neurons, augments ectopic discharge, and hence precipitates neuropathic pain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cell and Animal Biology, Institute of Life Sciences, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904, Israel.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10899197

Citation

Liu, C N., et al. "Spinal Nerve Injury Enhances Subthreshold Membrane Potential Oscillations in DRG Neurons: Relation to Neuropathic Pain." Journal of Neurophysiology, vol. 84, no. 1, 2000, pp. 205-15.
Liu CN, Michaelis M, Amir R, et al. Spinal nerve injury enhances subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in DRG neurons: relation to neuropathic pain. J Neurophysiol. 2000;84(1):205-15.
Liu, C. N., Michaelis, M., Amir, R., & Devor, M. (2000). Spinal nerve injury enhances subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in DRG neurons: relation to neuropathic pain. Journal of Neurophysiology, 84(1), 205-15.
Liu CN, et al. Spinal Nerve Injury Enhances Subthreshold Membrane Potential Oscillations in DRG Neurons: Relation to Neuropathic Pain. J Neurophysiol. 2000;84(1):205-15. PubMed PMID: 10899197.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Spinal nerve injury enhances subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in DRG neurons: relation to neuropathic pain. AU - Liu,C N, AU - Michaelis,M, AU - Amir,R, AU - Devor,M, PY - 2000/7/19/pubmed PY - 2000/9/9/medline PY - 2000/7/19/entrez SP - 205 EP - 15 JF - Journal of neurophysiology JO - J Neurophysiol VL - 84 IS - 1 N2 - Primary sensory neurons with myelinated axons were examined in vitro in excised whole lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) taken from adult rats up to 9 days after tight ligation and transection of the L(5) spinal nerve (Chung model of neuropathic pain). Properties of subthreshold membrane potential oscillations, and of repetitive spike discharge, were examined. About 5% of the DRG neurons sampled in control DRGs exhibited high-frequency, subthreshold sinusoidal oscillations in their membrane potential at rest (V(r)), and an additional 4.4% developed such oscillations on depolarization. Virtually all had noninflected action potentials (A(0) neurons). Amplitude and frequency of subthreshold oscillations were voltage sensitive. A(0) neurons with oscillations at V(r) appear to constitute a population distinct from A(0) neurons that oscillate only on depolarization. Axotomy triggered a significant increase in the proportion of neurons exhibiting subthreshold oscillations both at V(r) and on depolarization. This change occurred within a narrow time window 16-24 h postoperative. Axotomy also shifted the membrane potential at which oscillation amplitude was maximal to more negative (hyperpolarized) values, and lowered oscillation frequency at any given membrane potential. Most neurons that had oscillations at V(r), or that developed them on depolarization, began to fire repetitively when further depolarized. Spikes were triggered by the depolarizing phase of oscillatory sinusoids. Neurons that did not develop subthreshold oscillations never discharged repetitively and rarely fired more than a single spike or a short burst, on step depolarization. The most prominent spike waveform parameters distinguishing neurons capable of generating subthreshold oscillations, and hence repetitive firing, was their brief postspike afterhyperpolarization (AHP) and their low single-spike threshold. Neurons that oscillated at V(r) tended to have a more prolonged spike, with slower rise- and fall-time kinetics, and lower spike threshold, than cells that oscillated only on depolarization. The main effects of axotomy were to increase spike duration, slow rise- and fall-time kinetics, and reduce single-spike threshold. Tactile allodynia following spinal nerve injury is thought to result from central amplification ("central sensitization") of afferent signals entering the spinal cord from residual intact afferents. The central sensitization, in turn, is thought to be triggered and maintained in the Chung model by ectopic firing originating in the axotomized afferent neurons. Axotomy by spinal nerve injury enhances subthreshold membrane potential oscillations in DRG neurons, augments ectopic discharge, and hence precipitates neuropathic pain. SN - 0022-3077 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10899197/Spinal_nerve_injury_enhances_subthreshold_membrane_potential_oscillations_in_DRG_neurons:_relation_to_neuropathic_pain_ L2 - https://journals.physiology.org/doi/10.1152/jn.2000.84.1.205?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -