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The effect of virtual reality during dental treatment on child anxiety and behavior.
ASDC J Dent Child. 2000 May-Jun; 67(3):193-6, 160-1.AJ

Abstract

Virtual reality, a three-dimensional computer generated world, has been shown to relax adults during dental treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of virtual reality on the behavior and anxiety of children during dental treatment. The behavior, anxiety and heart rate of twenty-six children, ages five to seven years were evaluated for the first five minutes of two restorative treatment visits. Thirteen children viewed virtual reality at their first restorative visit and not the second, and thirteen children viewed virtual reality at the second restorative visit and not the first. Before and immediately following the restorative visits, each child was instructed to draw a human figure. The restorative appointments were video recorded and heart rate monitored. The drawings and videotapes were rated independently by two examiners. The Koppitz method of evaluating drawings was used to measure anxiety. The Frankl behavior rating scale was used to evaluate behavior. Differences (ANOVA) in behavior (p < or = 0.50) and anxiety (p < or = 0.65) were not significant. The overall pulse rate was significantly lower (ANOVA p < or = 0.001) when the child was wearing glasses and viewing virtual reality. In conclusion, virtual reality during dental treatment had no significant effect on the behavior or anxiety but significantly reduced the pulse.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Louisiana State University School of Dentistry, New Orleans 70119, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10902078

Citation

Sullivan, C, et al. "The Effect of Virtual Reality During Dental Treatment On Child Anxiety and Behavior." ASDC Journal of Dentistry for Children, vol. 67, no. 3, 2000, pp. 193-6, 160-1.
Sullivan C, Schneider PE, Musselman RJ, et al. The effect of virtual reality during dental treatment on child anxiety and behavior. ASDC J Dent Child. 2000;67(3):193-6, 160-1.
Sullivan, C., Schneider, P. E., Musselman, R. J., Dummett, C. O., & Gardiner, D. (2000). The effect of virtual reality during dental treatment on child anxiety and behavior. ASDC Journal of Dentistry for Children, 67(3), 193-6, 160-1.
Sullivan C, et al. The Effect of Virtual Reality During Dental Treatment On Child Anxiety and Behavior. ASDC J Dent Child. 2000 May-Jun;67(3):193-6, 160-1. PubMed PMID: 10902078.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of virtual reality during dental treatment on child anxiety and behavior. AU - Sullivan,C, AU - Schneider,P E, AU - Musselman,R J, AU - Dummett,C O,Jr AU - Gardiner,D, PY - 2000/7/21/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/7/21/entrez SP - 193-6, 160-1 JF - ASDC journal of dentistry for children JO - ASDC J Dent Child VL - 67 IS - 3 N2 - Virtual reality, a three-dimensional computer generated world, has been shown to relax adults during dental treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of virtual reality on the behavior and anxiety of children during dental treatment. The behavior, anxiety and heart rate of twenty-six children, ages five to seven years were evaluated for the first five minutes of two restorative treatment visits. Thirteen children viewed virtual reality at their first restorative visit and not the second, and thirteen children viewed virtual reality at the second restorative visit and not the first. Before and immediately following the restorative visits, each child was instructed to draw a human figure. The restorative appointments were video recorded and heart rate monitored. The drawings and videotapes were rated independently by two examiners. The Koppitz method of evaluating drawings was used to measure anxiety. The Frankl behavior rating scale was used to evaluate behavior. Differences (ANOVA) in behavior (p < or = 0.50) and anxiety (p < or = 0.65) were not significant. The overall pulse rate was significantly lower (ANOVA p < or = 0.001) when the child was wearing glasses and viewing virtual reality. In conclusion, virtual reality during dental treatment had no significant effect on the behavior or anxiety but significantly reduced the pulse. SN - 1945-1954 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10902078/The_effect_of_virtual_reality_during_dental_treatment_on_child_anxiety_and_behavior_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/7698 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -