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Advance care planning in residential care.
Aust N Z J Med. 2000 Jun; 30(3):339-43.AN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To provide optimal care for our ageing population, some form of advance care planning (ACP) is essential. Overseas data suggest that the process of ACP and the use of advance care directives (ACD) is suboptimal in residential care institutions. By comparison there are few Australian data.

AIM

To study the process of ACP and the prevalence of ACD in residential care.

METHODS

Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire in the Hunter area, NSW, Australia.

RESULTS

Very low levels of formal advance directives were found (available for only 0.2%). Only 1.1% of residents had 'no-CPR' orders documented in the medical record, while 5.6% had a formal guardian and 2.8% had an enduring guardian. Informal processes of advance planning were much more prevalent. Sixty-five per cent had a 'person responsible' recorded to make decisions for them while in 13% of cases, there was 'staff consensus' as to the optimal care for the patient. However, in 10.6% there was no clear process for medical decision making identified.

CONCLUSIONS

Advanced directives are infrequently used in residential care. Further qualitative and quantitative studies are warranted to explore current processes of decision making.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Geriatric Medicine, John Hunter Hospital, Newcastle, NSW. knair@mail.newcastle.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10914751

Citation

Nair, B, et al. "Advance Care Planning in Residential Care." Australian and New Zealand Journal of Medicine, vol. 30, no. 3, 2000, pp. 339-43.
Nair B, Kerridge I, Dobson A, et al. Advance care planning in residential care. Aust N Z J Med. 2000;30(3):339-43.
Nair, B., Kerridge, I., Dobson, A., McPhee, J., & Saul, P. (2000). Advance care planning in residential care. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Medicine, 30(3), 339-43.
Nair B, et al. Advance Care Planning in Residential Care. Aust N Z J Med. 2000;30(3):339-43. PubMed PMID: 10914751.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Advance care planning in residential care. AU - Nair,B, AU - Kerridge,I, AU - Dobson,A, AU - McPhee,J, AU - Saul,P, PY - 2000/7/29/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/7/29/entrez SP - 339 EP - 43 JF - Australian and New Zealand journal of medicine JO - Aust N Z J Med VL - 30 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: To provide optimal care for our ageing population, some form of advance care planning (ACP) is essential. Overseas data suggest that the process of ACP and the use of advance care directives (ACD) is suboptimal in residential care institutions. By comparison there are few Australian data. AIM: To study the process of ACP and the prevalence of ACD in residential care. METHODS: Cross-sectional study using a questionnaire in the Hunter area, NSW, Australia. RESULTS: Very low levels of formal advance directives were found (available for only 0.2%). Only 1.1% of residents had 'no-CPR' orders documented in the medical record, while 5.6% had a formal guardian and 2.8% had an enduring guardian. Informal processes of advance planning were much more prevalent. Sixty-five per cent had a 'person responsible' recorded to make decisions for them while in 13% of cases, there was 'staff consensus' as to the optimal care for the patient. However, in 10.6% there was no clear process for medical decision making identified. CONCLUSIONS: Advanced directives are infrequently used in residential care. Further qualitative and quantitative studies are warranted to explore current processes of decision making. SN - 0004-8291 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10914751/Advance_care_planning_in_residential_care_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0004-8291&date=2000&volume=30&issue=3&spage=339 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -