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Low intakes of vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits, lead to inadequate vitamin C intakes among adults.
Eur J Clin Nutr 2000; 54(7):573-8EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine vitamin C intakes among adults and to identify differences in dietary intake associated with vitamin C consumption.

DESIGN

This cross-sectional study compared vitamin C intake, nutrient intake, and food group choices of adults with low (<30 mg/d), marginal (30-60 mg/d), and desirable (>60 mg/d) vitamin C intakes.

SUBJECTS

Data from 2472 men and 2334 women aged 25-75 y were obtained from the 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII).

RESULTS

Overall, 18% of the sample had low vitamin C intakes, 24% had marginal intakes, and 58% had desirable intakes. In addition to consuming less vitamin C, adults with low vitamin C intakes consumed significantly less (P</=0.001) energy-adjusted (ie nutrient/1000 kcal) folate, fiber, beta-carotene, and vitamin B6, and significantly more (P<0.001) fat. Compared to adults with low intakes, adults with desirable vitamin C intakes consumed significantly more (P</=0.001) high-vitamin C fruit juice and low-vitamin C vegetables, while consuming significantly less (P</=0.009) soft drinks, coffee/tea and alcoholic beverages. On average, adults with desirable vitamin C intakes consumed more than five daily servings of vegetables and fruits, of which more than one was citrus. Adults with low and marginal vitamin C intakes consumed less than one-fifth of a serving of citrus.

CONCLUSIONS

A considerable number of adults under-consume vitamin C and total vegetables and fruits. Nutritionists should continue to promote five to nine daily servings of vegetables and fruits, at least one of which should be rich in vitamin C.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Arizona State University, Box 872502, Tempe, AZ 85287-2502, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10918468

Citation

Taylor, C A., et al. "Low Intakes of Vegetables and Fruits, Especially Citrus Fruits, Lead to Inadequate Vitamin C Intakes Among Adults." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 54, no. 7, 2000, pp. 573-8.
Taylor CA, Hampl JS, Johnston CS. Low intakes of vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits, lead to inadequate vitamin C intakes among adults. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000;54(7):573-8.
Taylor, C. A., Hampl, J. S., & Johnston, C. S. (2000). Low intakes of vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits, lead to inadequate vitamin C intakes among adults. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 54(7), pp. 573-8.
Taylor CA, Hampl JS, Johnston CS. Low Intakes of Vegetables and Fruits, Especially Citrus Fruits, Lead to Inadequate Vitamin C Intakes Among Adults. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2000;54(7):573-8. PubMed PMID: 10918468.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Low intakes of vegetables and fruits, especially citrus fruits, lead to inadequate vitamin C intakes among adults. AU - Taylor,C A, AU - Hampl,J S, AU - Johnston,C S, PY - 2000/8/5/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/8/5/entrez SP - 573 EP - 8 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 54 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine vitamin C intakes among adults and to identify differences in dietary intake associated with vitamin C consumption. DESIGN: This cross-sectional study compared vitamin C intake, nutrient intake, and food group choices of adults with low (<30 mg/d), marginal (30-60 mg/d), and desirable (>60 mg/d) vitamin C intakes. SUBJECTS: Data from 2472 men and 2334 women aged 25-75 y were obtained from the 1994-1996 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals (CSFII). RESULTS: Overall, 18% of the sample had low vitamin C intakes, 24% had marginal intakes, and 58% had desirable intakes. In addition to consuming less vitamin C, adults with low vitamin C intakes consumed significantly less (P</=0.001) energy-adjusted (ie nutrient/1000 kcal) folate, fiber, beta-carotene, and vitamin B6, and significantly more (P<0.001) fat. Compared to adults with low intakes, adults with desirable vitamin C intakes consumed significantly more (P</=0.001) high-vitamin C fruit juice and low-vitamin C vegetables, while consuming significantly less (P</=0.009) soft drinks, coffee/tea and alcoholic beverages. On average, adults with desirable vitamin C intakes consumed more than five daily servings of vegetables and fruits, of which more than one was citrus. Adults with low and marginal vitamin C intakes consumed less than one-fifth of a serving of citrus. CONCLUSIONS: A considerable number of adults under-consume vitamin C and total vegetables and fruits. Nutritionists should continue to promote five to nine daily servings of vegetables and fruits, at least one of which should be rich in vitamin C. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10918468/Low_intakes_of_vegetables_and_fruits_especially_citrus_fruits_lead_to_inadequate_vitamin_C_intakes_among_adults_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/vitaminc.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -