Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Outbreak of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections in medical center personnel.
Am J Epidemiol. 1975 Feb; 101(2):103-10.AJ

Abstract

An outbreak of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) virus infections occurred in Medical Center personnel at the University of Rochester in 1972-1973. A total of 48 infections was discovered, 31 in staff of the radiation therapy area, 12 in the staff of the Vivarium facility, and 5 in other individuals who worked in the Medical Center. Twenty-one of the infections were associated with recent febrile illness with myalgia. Epidemiologic and virologic studies indicated that the source of the infection was Syrian hamsters which were used in tumor research; the tumor cell lines themselves were shown to be contaminated with LCM virus and probably represented the original source of contamination of the Rochester facility. Infection occurred not only through direct contact with infected animals but also from mere presence in the room where the animals were held. This outbreak emphasizes the need for restricting access to animal quarters and for surveillance of hamsters and tumor cell lines and indicate the necessity of separating animal facilities from patient-care facilities.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1092154

Citation

Hinman, A R., et al. "Outbreak of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infections in Medical Center Personnel." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 101, no. 2, 1975, pp. 103-10.
Hinman AR, Fraser DW, Douglas RG, et al. Outbreak of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections in medical center personnel. Am J Epidemiol. 1975;101(2):103-10.
Hinman, A. R., Fraser, D. W., Douglas, R. G., Bowen, G. S., Kraus, A. L., Winkler, W. G., & Rhodes, W. W. (1975). Outbreak of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections in medical center personnel. American Journal of Epidemiology, 101(2), 103-10.
Hinman AR, et al. Outbreak of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infections in Medical Center Personnel. Am J Epidemiol. 1975;101(2):103-10. PubMed PMID: 1092154.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outbreak of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infections in medical center personnel. AU - Hinman,A R, AU - Fraser,D W, AU - Douglas,R G, AU - Bowen,G S, AU - Kraus,A L, AU - Winkler,W G, AU - Rhodes,W W, PY - 1975/2/1/pubmed PY - 1975/2/1/medline PY - 1975/2/1/entrez SP - 103 EP - 10 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am J Epidemiol VL - 101 IS - 2 N2 - An outbreak of lymphocytic choriomeningitis (LCM) virus infections occurred in Medical Center personnel at the University of Rochester in 1972-1973. A total of 48 infections was discovered, 31 in staff of the radiation therapy area, 12 in the staff of the Vivarium facility, and 5 in other individuals who worked in the Medical Center. Twenty-one of the infections were associated with recent febrile illness with myalgia. Epidemiologic and virologic studies indicated that the source of the infection was Syrian hamsters which were used in tumor research; the tumor cell lines themselves were shown to be contaminated with LCM virus and probably represented the original source of contamination of the Rochester facility. Infection occurred not only through direct contact with infected animals but also from mere presence in the room where the animals were held. This outbreak emphasizes the need for restricting access to animal quarters and for surveillance of hamsters and tumor cell lines and indicate the necessity of separating animal facilities from patient-care facilities. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1092154/Outbreak_of_lymphocytic_choriomeningitis_virus_infections_in_medical_center_personnel_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a112076 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -