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Routine pharyngeal cultures may not be useful in pediatric victims of sexual assault.
J Emerg Nurs 2000; 26(4):306-11JE

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

This study was conducted to determine the usefulness of routine pharyngeal cultures in pediatric sexual assault victims.

METHODS

A retrospective chart review was conducted to examine incidence data. The study was conducted in a 656-bed tertiary care hospital with 60,000 ED visits and approximately 350 pediatric sexual assault examinations annually. Records of all pediatric sexual assault examinations completed between 12:01 AM January 1, 1994, and 12:01 AM January 1, 1997, were retrospectively reviewed for inclusion. Subjects were included if they were younger than 15 years and had a nonacute examination for a suspected sexual assault. The final sample included 370 females and 81 males (total n=451 children). Oral and anal cultures were obtained on all patients. In addition, female patients had vaginal cultures and male patients had penile cultures performed. Culture specimens were sent for detection of chlamydia and gonococcus organisms.

RESULTS

Of the 451 sets of cultures examined, there were 6 patients with one or more positive culture results. The 6 patients yielded a total of 10 positive culture results: 1 anal only, 1 vaginal only, and 4 both anal and vaginal. This was a positive culture rate of 1.3% overall. The positive culture result rates by site were oral 0%, vaginal 1.6%, anal 1.1%, and penile 0%. The ages of patients with positive culture results ranged from 2 to 13 years; all of those with positive culture results were female.

DISCUSSION

The incidence of positive oral culture results in this sample was zero. This finding supports a more limited approach to standard sexually transmitted disease screening in pediatric sexual assault victims. The elimination of routine oral cultures in pediatric victims without alleged oral contact decreases the examination time, decreases the number of invasive procedures associated with the examination, and decreases the cost of the examination without negatively affecting patient care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Program, Inova Fairfax Hospital, Falls Church, Va., USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Validation Studies

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10940838

Citation

Brown, S L., et al. "Routine Pharyngeal Cultures May Not Be Useful in Pediatric Victims of Sexual Assault." Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN : Official Publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association, vol. 26, no. 4, 2000, pp. 306-11.
Brown SL, Peck KR, Watts DD. Routine pharyngeal cultures may not be useful in pediatric victims of sexual assault. J Emerg Nurs. 2000;26(4):306-11.
Brown, S. L., Peck, K. R., & Watts, D. D. (2000). Routine pharyngeal cultures may not be useful in pediatric victims of sexual assault. Journal of Emergency Nursing: JEN : Official Publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association, 26(4), pp. 306-11.
Brown SL, Peck KR, Watts DD. Routine Pharyngeal Cultures May Not Be Useful in Pediatric Victims of Sexual Assault. J Emerg Nurs. 2000;26(4):306-11. PubMed PMID: 10940838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Routine pharyngeal cultures may not be useful in pediatric victims of sexual assault. AU - Brown,S L, AU - Peck,K R, AU - Watts,D D, PY - 2000/8/15/pubmed PY - 2001/6/8/medline PY - 2000/8/15/entrez SP - 306 EP - 11 JF - Journal of emergency nursing: JEN : official publication of the Emergency Department Nurses Association JO - J Emerg Nurs VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: This study was conducted to determine the usefulness of routine pharyngeal cultures in pediatric sexual assault victims. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was conducted to examine incidence data. The study was conducted in a 656-bed tertiary care hospital with 60,000 ED visits and approximately 350 pediatric sexual assault examinations annually. Records of all pediatric sexual assault examinations completed between 12:01 AM January 1, 1994, and 12:01 AM January 1, 1997, were retrospectively reviewed for inclusion. Subjects were included if they were younger than 15 years and had a nonacute examination for a suspected sexual assault. The final sample included 370 females and 81 males (total n=451 children). Oral and anal cultures were obtained on all patients. In addition, female patients had vaginal cultures and male patients had penile cultures performed. Culture specimens were sent for detection of chlamydia and gonococcus organisms. RESULTS: Of the 451 sets of cultures examined, there were 6 patients with one or more positive culture results. The 6 patients yielded a total of 10 positive culture results: 1 anal only, 1 vaginal only, and 4 both anal and vaginal. This was a positive culture rate of 1.3% overall. The positive culture result rates by site were oral 0%, vaginal 1.6%, anal 1.1%, and penile 0%. The ages of patients with positive culture results ranged from 2 to 13 years; all of those with positive culture results were female. DISCUSSION: The incidence of positive oral culture results in this sample was zero. This finding supports a more limited approach to standard sexually transmitted disease screening in pediatric sexual assault victims. The elimination of routine oral cultures in pediatric victims without alleged oral contact decreases the examination time, decreases the number of invasive procedures associated with the examination, and decreases the cost of the examination without negatively affecting patient care. SN - 0099-1767 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10940838/Routine_pharyngeal_cultures_may_not_be_useful_in_pediatric_victims_of_sexual_assault L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0099-1767(00)15882-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -