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The work patterns of male and female dental practitioners in the United Kingdom.
Int Dent J. 2000 Apr; 50(2):61-8.ID

Abstract

AIM

The aim of the study was to determine differences between male and female dental practitioners in the type of dentistry they practice, and their working practice, and to compare these data to previously published studies of the working practices of female dentists in the United Kingdom.

DESIGN

A postal questionnaire survey.

PARTICIPANTS

A 1 in 10 sample of individuals taken from the UK Dentists Register.

RESULTS

The data revealed that women dentists are more likely than male dentists to work in the Community Dental Service. Within general dental practice women are more likely to work part-time, to carry out National Health Service treatment and to specialize in orthodontics or paediatric dentistry. More women than men take career breaks, and the reasons for taking career breaks differ between male and females. Women take longer career breaks on average. However, differences between male and female practitioners in the total duration of their career breaks are largely accounted for by child rearing. Finally, male dental practitioners are more likely than female dental practitioners to report reading professional journals. The findings are analysed in the light of previous surveys of the working practices of female dental practitioners both within the United Kingdom and internationally.

CONCLUSION

The main finding reported here is that there are no differences between men and women in the number and length of career breaks taken, if childcare is excluded.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Guy's King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine and Dentistry, Guy's Hospital, London, UK. tim.newton@kcl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10945183

Citation

Newton, J T., et al. "The Work Patterns of Male and Female Dental Practitioners in the United Kingdom." International Dental Journal, vol. 50, no. 2, 2000, pp. 61-8.
Newton JT, Thorogood N, Gibbons DE. The work patterns of male and female dental practitioners in the United Kingdom. Int Dent J. 2000;50(2):61-8.
Newton, J. T., Thorogood, N., & Gibbons, D. E. (2000). The work patterns of male and female dental practitioners in the United Kingdom. International Dental Journal, 50(2), 61-8.
Newton JT, Thorogood N, Gibbons DE. The Work Patterns of Male and Female Dental Practitioners in the United Kingdom. Int Dent J. 2000;50(2):61-8. PubMed PMID: 10945183.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The work patterns of male and female dental practitioners in the United Kingdom. AU - Newton,J T, AU - Thorogood,N, AU - Gibbons,D E, PY - 2000/8/17/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/8/17/entrez SP - 61 EP - 8 JF - International dental journal JO - Int Dent J VL - 50 IS - 2 N2 - AIM: The aim of the study was to determine differences between male and female dental practitioners in the type of dentistry they practice, and their working practice, and to compare these data to previously published studies of the working practices of female dentists in the United Kingdom. DESIGN: A postal questionnaire survey. PARTICIPANTS: A 1 in 10 sample of individuals taken from the UK Dentists Register. RESULTS: The data revealed that women dentists are more likely than male dentists to work in the Community Dental Service. Within general dental practice women are more likely to work part-time, to carry out National Health Service treatment and to specialize in orthodontics or paediatric dentistry. More women than men take career breaks, and the reasons for taking career breaks differ between male and females. Women take longer career breaks on average. However, differences between male and female practitioners in the total duration of their career breaks are largely accounted for by child rearing. Finally, male dental practitioners are more likely than female dental practitioners to report reading professional journals. The findings are analysed in the light of previous surveys of the working practices of female dental practitioners both within the United Kingdom and internationally. CONCLUSION: The main finding reported here is that there are no differences between men and women in the number and length of career breaks taken, if childcare is excluded. SN - 0020-6539 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10945183/The_work_patterns_of_male_and_female_dental_practitioners_in_the_United_Kingdom_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0020-6539&date=2000&volume=50&issue=2&spage=61 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -