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Slow-release caffeine: a new response to the effects of a limited sleep deprivation.
Sleep. 2000 Aug 01; 23(5):651-61.S

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study is to assess the interest of the intake of a new galenic form of caffeine called "slow-release" caffeine (SR caffeine) during a decrease of vigilance due to a limited sleep deprivation.

DESIGN

The controlled method used compared three doses of SR caffeine (150, 300 and 600 mg) with a placebo. Tests were performed 2, 9 and 13 hours after each treatment. Wakefulness level was assessed subjectively through questionnaires and analog visual scales, and objectively with the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Performance level was also assessed regularly with an attention test, a grammatical reasoning test, a spatial recognition test, a mathematical processing test, a visual tracking test, a memory search test, and a dual task. The motor activity was evaluated by wrist actimeter and safety of treatment was observed by regular clinical examination.

SETTING

NA.

PARTICIPANTS

Twenty-four young and healthy volunteers (12 men and 12 women) participated in a 32-hour sleep deprivation.

INTERVENTIONS

NA.

RESULTS

The results show a significant effect of slow-release caffeine vs. placebo, and on vigilance and performance when subjects became tired. The effects of SR caffeine lasted 13 hours after treatment. SR caffeine 300 and 600 mg are efficacious doses but the optimal dose (maximum effect without any side effects) for both men and women is after all 300 mg. Globally, there is no difference between placebo and caffeine during the recovery night period.

CONCLUSIONS

SR caffeine (300 mg) seems to be an efficient and safety substance to maintain a good level of vigilance and performance during limited sleep deprivation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Département de Neurophysiologie de l'Institut de Médecine Aérospatiale du Service de Santé des Armées, Brétigny sur Orge, France. dlagarde@imassa.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10947033

Citation

Lagarde, D, et al. "Slow-release Caffeine: a New Response to the Effects of a Limited Sleep Deprivation." Sleep, vol. 23, no. 5, 2000, pp. 651-61.
Lagarde D, Batéjat D, Sicard B, et al. Slow-release caffeine: a new response to the effects of a limited sleep deprivation. Sleep. 2000;23(5):651-61.
Lagarde, D., Batéjat, D., Sicard, B., Trocherie, S., Chassard, D., Enslen, M., & Chauffard, F. (2000). Slow-release caffeine: a new response to the effects of a limited sleep deprivation. Sleep, 23(5), 651-61.
Lagarde D, et al. Slow-release Caffeine: a New Response to the Effects of a Limited Sleep Deprivation. Sleep. 2000 Aug 1;23(5):651-61. PubMed PMID: 10947033.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Slow-release caffeine: a new response to the effects of a limited sleep deprivation. AU - Lagarde,D, AU - Batéjat,D, AU - Sicard,B, AU - Trocherie,S, AU - Chassard,D, AU - Enslen,M, AU - Chauffard,F, PY - 2000/8/18/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/8/18/entrez SP - 651 EP - 61 JF - Sleep JO - Sleep VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - STUDY OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to assess the interest of the intake of a new galenic form of caffeine called "slow-release" caffeine (SR caffeine) during a decrease of vigilance due to a limited sleep deprivation. DESIGN: The controlled method used compared three doses of SR caffeine (150, 300 and 600 mg) with a placebo. Tests were performed 2, 9 and 13 hours after each treatment. Wakefulness level was assessed subjectively through questionnaires and analog visual scales, and objectively with the Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Performance level was also assessed regularly with an attention test, a grammatical reasoning test, a spatial recognition test, a mathematical processing test, a visual tracking test, a memory search test, and a dual task. The motor activity was evaluated by wrist actimeter and safety of treatment was observed by regular clinical examination. SETTING: NA. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-four young and healthy volunteers (12 men and 12 women) participated in a 32-hour sleep deprivation. INTERVENTIONS: NA. RESULTS: The results show a significant effect of slow-release caffeine vs. placebo, and on vigilance and performance when subjects became tired. The effects of SR caffeine lasted 13 hours after treatment. SR caffeine 300 and 600 mg are efficacious doses but the optimal dose (maximum effect without any side effects) for both men and women is after all 300 mg. Globally, there is no difference between placebo and caffeine during the recovery night period. CONCLUSIONS: SR caffeine (300 mg) seems to be an efficient and safety substance to maintain a good level of vigilance and performance during limited sleep deprivation. SN - 0161-8105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10947033/Slow_release_caffeine:_a_new_response_to_the_effects_of_a_limited_sleep_deprivation_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=10947033.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -