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Food-safety educational goals for dietetics and hospitality students.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2000 Aug; 100(8):919-27.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify food-safety educational goals for dietetics and hospitality management students.

DESIGN

Written questionnaires were used to identify educational goals and the most important food safety competencies for entry-level dietitians and foodservice managers.

SUBJECTS

The sample included all directors of didactic programs in dietetics approved by the American Dietetic Association and baccalaureate-degree hospitality programs with membership in the Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education. Fifty-one percent of the directors responded.

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS

Descriptive statistics were calculated. chi 2 analysis and independent t tests were used to compare educators' responses for discrete and continuous variables, respectively. Exploratory factor analysis grouped statements about food safety competence. Internal consistency of factors was measured using Cronbach alpha.

RESULTS

Thirty-four percent of dietetics programs and 70% of hospitality programs required or offered food safety certification. Dietetics educators reported multiple courses with food safety information, whereas hospitality educators identified 1 or 2 courses. In general, the educators rated food-safety competencies as very important or essential. Concepts related to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HAACP), irradiation, and pasteurization were rated less highly, compared with other items. Competencies related to reasons for outbreaks of foodborne illness were rated as most important.

APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS

Food safety certification of dietitians and an increased emphasis on HAACP at the undergraduate level or during the practice component are suggested. Research is recommended to assess the level of food-safety competence expected by employers of entry-level dietitians and foodservice managers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Family and Consumer Studies, Kent State University, OH 44242-0001, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10955050

Citation

Scheule, B. "Food-safety Educational Goals for Dietetics and Hospitality Students." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 100, no. 8, 2000, pp. 919-27.
Scheule B. Food-safety educational goals for dietetics and hospitality students. J Am Diet Assoc. 2000;100(8):919-27.
Scheule, B. (2000). Food-safety educational goals for dietetics and hospitality students. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 100(8), 919-27.
Scheule B. Food-safety Educational Goals for Dietetics and Hospitality Students. J Am Diet Assoc. 2000;100(8):919-27. PubMed PMID: 10955050.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food-safety educational goals for dietetics and hospitality students. A1 - Scheule,B, PY - 2000/8/24/pubmed PY - 2000/9/2/medline PY - 2000/8/24/entrez SP - 919 EP - 27 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 100 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify food-safety educational goals for dietetics and hospitality management students. DESIGN: Written questionnaires were used to identify educational goals and the most important food safety competencies for entry-level dietitians and foodservice managers. SUBJECTS: The sample included all directors of didactic programs in dietetics approved by the American Dietetic Association and baccalaureate-degree hospitality programs with membership in the Council on Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Education. Fifty-one percent of the directors responded. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Descriptive statistics were calculated. chi 2 analysis and independent t tests were used to compare educators' responses for discrete and continuous variables, respectively. Exploratory factor analysis grouped statements about food safety competence. Internal consistency of factors was measured using Cronbach alpha. RESULTS: Thirty-four percent of dietetics programs and 70% of hospitality programs required or offered food safety certification. Dietetics educators reported multiple courses with food safety information, whereas hospitality educators identified 1 or 2 courses. In general, the educators rated food-safety competencies as very important or essential. Concepts related to Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HAACP), irradiation, and pasteurization were rated less highly, compared with other items. Competencies related to reasons for outbreaks of foodborne illness were rated as most important. APPLICATIONS/CONCLUSIONS: Food safety certification of dietitians and an increased emphasis on HAACP at the undergraduate level or during the practice component are suggested. Research is recommended to assess the level of food-safety competence expected by employers of entry-level dietitians and foodservice managers. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10955050/Food_safety_educational_goals_for_dietetics_and_hospitality_students_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(00)00265-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -