Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Preparing patients to travel abroad safely. Part 4: Reducing risk of accidents, diarrhea, and sexually transmitted diseases.
Can Fam Physician. 2000 Aug; 46:1634-8.CF

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To present evidence-based recommendations on traveling abroad safely so family physicians can advise travelers on how to reduce risk of accidents, diarrhea, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and how to treat diarrhea themselves if medical care is unavailable.

QUALITY OF EVIDENCE

A MEDLINE search from 1990 to November 1998 found 163 articles on travel and accidents, 504 on travel and diarrhea, and 42 on travel and STDs. Titles and abstracts were reviewed, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews were sought. The Cochrane Collaboration database of systematic reviews and meta-analyses was searched for studies relevant to family physicians.

MAIN MESSAGE

For preventing diarrhea, RCTs demonstrate that bismuth subsalicylate, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are useful prophylactics. Once travelers have diarrhea, RCTs show that loperamide and zaldaride reduce symptoms and duration; quinolones, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and oral aztreonam reduce abdominal symptoms and time to last liquid stool by several days; azithromycin is effective in treatment of ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is effective in treating cyclospora. There are no RCTs of preventing accidents and STDs abroad. Health Canada has issued a statement summarizing the risks of acquiring STDs abroad.

CONCLUSION

Family physicians can advise their patients on how to reduce risk of travelers' diarrhea and how to treat it themselves on holiday. There is expert advice on how to reduce risk of STDs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Memorial University of Newfoundland, St John's. rogert@morgan.ucs.mun.ca

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10955183

Citation

Thomas, R E.. "Preparing Patients to Travel Abroad Safely. Part 4: Reducing Risk of Accidents, Diarrhea, and Sexually Transmitted Diseases." Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien, vol. 46, 2000, pp. 1634-8.
Thomas RE. Preparing patients to travel abroad safely. Part 4: Reducing risk of accidents, diarrhea, and sexually transmitted diseases. Can Fam Physician. 2000;46:1634-8.
Thomas, R. E. (2000). Preparing patients to travel abroad safely. Part 4: Reducing risk of accidents, diarrhea, and sexually transmitted diseases. Canadian Family Physician Medecin De Famille Canadien, 46, 1634-8.
Thomas RE. Preparing Patients to Travel Abroad Safely. Part 4: Reducing Risk of Accidents, Diarrhea, and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Can Fam Physician. 2000;46:1634-8. PubMed PMID: 10955183.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Preparing patients to travel abroad safely. Part 4: Reducing risk of accidents, diarrhea, and sexually transmitted diseases. A1 - Thomas,R E, PY - 2000/8/24/pubmed PY - 2000/9/23/medline PY - 2000/8/24/entrez SP - 1634 EP - 8 JF - Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien JO - Can Fam Physician VL - 46 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To present evidence-based recommendations on traveling abroad safely so family physicians can advise travelers on how to reduce risk of accidents, diarrhea, and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and how to treat diarrhea themselves if medical care is unavailable. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search from 1990 to November 1998 found 163 articles on travel and accidents, 504 on travel and diarrhea, and 42 on travel and STDs. Titles and abstracts were reviewed, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews were sought. The Cochrane Collaboration database of systematic reviews and meta-analyses was searched for studies relevant to family physicians. MAIN MESSAGE: For preventing diarrhea, RCTs demonstrate that bismuth subsalicylate, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole are useful prophylactics. Once travelers have diarrhea, RCTs show that loperamide and zaldaride reduce symptoms and duration; quinolones, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and oral aztreonam reduce abdominal symptoms and time to last liquid stool by several days; azithromycin is effective in treatment of ciprofloxacin-resistant Campylobacter, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is effective in treating cyclospora. There are no RCTs of preventing accidents and STDs abroad. Health Canada has issued a statement summarizing the risks of acquiring STDs abroad. CONCLUSION: Family physicians can advise their patients on how to reduce risk of travelers' diarrhea and how to treat it themselves on holiday. There is expert advice on how to reduce risk of STDs. SN - 0008-350X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10955183/Preparing_patients_to_travel_abroad_safely__Part_4:_Reducing_risk_of_accidents_diarrhea_and_sexually_transmitted_diseases_ L2 - http://www.cfp.ca/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=10955183 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -