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Predicting the probability for falls in community-dwelling older adults using the Timed Up & Go Test.
Phys Ther. 2000 Sep; 80(9):896-903.PT

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

This study examined the sensitivity and specificity of the Timed Up & Go Test (TUG) under single-task versus dual-task conditions for identifying elderly individuals who are prone to falling.

SUBJECTS

Fifteen older adults with no history of falls (mean age=78 years, SD=6, range=65-85) and 15 older adults with a history of 2 or more falls in the previous 6 months (mean age=86.2 years, SD=6, range=76-95) participated.

METHODS

Time taken to complete the TUG under 3 conditions (TUG, TUG with a subtraction task [TUGcognitive], and TUG while carrying a full cup of water [TUGmanual]) was measured. A multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant function and logistic regression analyses were performed.

RESULTS

The TUG was found to be a sensitive (sensitivity=87%) and specific (specificity=87%) measure for identifying elderly individuals who are prone to falls. For both groups of older adults, simultaneous performance of an additional task increased the time taken to complete the TUG, with the greatest effect in the older adults with a history of falls. The TUG scores with or without an additional task (cognitive or manual) were equivalent with respect to identifying fallers and nonfallers.

CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION

The results suggest that the TUG is a sensitive and specific measure for identifying community-dwelling adults who are at risk for falls. The ability to predict falls is not enhanced by adding a secondary task when performing the TUG.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Physical Therapy, University of Washington, Box 356490, Seattle, WA 98195, USA. ashumway@u.washington.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10960937

Citation

Shumway-Cook, A, et al. "Predicting the Probability for Falls in Community-dwelling Older Adults Using the Timed Up & Go Test." Physical Therapy, vol. 80, no. 9, 2000, pp. 896-903.
Shumway-Cook A, Brauer S, Woollacott M. Predicting the probability for falls in community-dwelling older adults using the Timed Up & Go Test. Phys Ther. 2000;80(9):896-903.
Shumway-Cook, A., Brauer, S., & Woollacott, M. (2000). Predicting the probability for falls in community-dwelling older adults using the Timed Up & Go Test. Physical Therapy, 80(9), 896-903.
Shumway-Cook A, Brauer S, Woollacott M. Predicting the Probability for Falls in Community-dwelling Older Adults Using the Timed Up & Go Test. Phys Ther. 2000;80(9):896-903. PubMed PMID: 10960937.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predicting the probability for falls in community-dwelling older adults using the Timed Up & Go Test. AU - Shumway-Cook,A, AU - Brauer,S, AU - Woollacott,M, PY - 2000/8/29/pubmed PY - 2000/9/30/medline PY - 2000/8/29/entrez SP - 896 EP - 903 JF - Physical therapy JO - Phys Ther VL - 80 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study examined the sensitivity and specificity of the Timed Up & Go Test (TUG) under single-task versus dual-task conditions for identifying elderly individuals who are prone to falling. SUBJECTS: Fifteen older adults with no history of falls (mean age=78 years, SD=6, range=65-85) and 15 older adults with a history of 2 or more falls in the previous 6 months (mean age=86.2 years, SD=6, range=76-95) participated. METHODS: Time taken to complete the TUG under 3 conditions (TUG, TUG with a subtraction task [TUGcognitive], and TUG while carrying a full cup of water [TUGmanual]) was measured. A multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant function and logistic regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: The TUG was found to be a sensitive (sensitivity=87%) and specific (specificity=87%) measure for identifying elderly individuals who are prone to falls. For both groups of older adults, simultaneous performance of an additional task increased the time taken to complete the TUG, with the greatest effect in the older adults with a history of falls. The TUG scores with or without an additional task (cognitive or manual) were equivalent with respect to identifying fallers and nonfallers. CONCLUSION AND DISCUSSION: The results suggest that the TUG is a sensitive and specific measure for identifying community-dwelling adults who are at risk for falls. The ability to predict falls is not enhanced by adding a secondary task when performing the TUG. SN - 0031-9023 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10960937/Predicting_the_probability_for_falls_in_community_dwelling_older_adults_using_the_Timed_Up_&_Go_Test_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=10960937 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -