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Risk factors for pediatric asthma. Contributions of poverty, race, and urban residence.

Abstract

The Child Health Supplement to the 1988 National Health Interview Survey was used to examine parent-reported current asthma among a nationally representative sample of 17,110 children zero to 17 yr of age. Numerous demographic variables were analyzed for independent associations with asthma using modified stepwise logistic regression, with models including specific combinations of risk factors. Black children had higher rates of asthma than did white children in unadjusted analyses, but after controlling for multiple factors, black race was not a significant correlate of asthma (adjusted odds ratio = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.63 to 1.21). Compared with nonurban white children, urban children, both black and white, were at significantly increased risk of asthma: urban and black (adjusted OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.86), urban and white (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.48), whereas nonurban black children were not: nonurban and black (adjusted OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.83 to 1.61). Similarly, compared with nonurban, nonpoor children, urban and poor (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.95), urban and nonpoor (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.004 to 1.48), urban children, both poor and nonpoor, were at significantly increased risk of asthma, whereas nonurban poor children were not: nonurban and poor (adjusted OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.72 to 1.48). These results suggest that the higher prevalence of asthma among black children is not due to race or to low income per se, and that all children living in an urban setting are at increased risk for asthma.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Strong Children's Research Center, Rochester General Hospital, and American Academy of Pediatrics Center for Child Health Research, Rochester, New York, USA. andrew.aligne@viahealth.org

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    African Continental Ancestry Group
    Asthma
    Causality
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    European Continental Ancestry Group
    Female
    Humans
    Incidence
    Infant
    Male
    Poverty
    Risk Factors
    Urban Population

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    10988098

    Citation

    Aligne, C A., et al. "Risk Factors for Pediatric Asthma. Contributions of Poverty, Race, and Urban Residence." American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 162, no. 3 Pt 1, 2000, pp. 873-7.
    Aligne CA, Auinger P, Byrd RS, et al. Risk factors for pediatric asthma. Contributions of poverty, race, and urban residence. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000;162(3 Pt 1):873-7.
    Aligne, C. A., Auinger, P., Byrd, R. S., & Weitzman, M. (2000). Risk factors for pediatric asthma. Contributions of poverty, race, and urban residence. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 162(3 Pt 1), pp. 873-7.
    Aligne CA, et al. Risk Factors for Pediatric Asthma. Contributions of Poverty, Race, and Urban Residence. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2000;162(3 Pt 1):873-7. PubMed PMID: 10988098.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors for pediatric asthma. Contributions of poverty, race, and urban residence. AU - Aligne,C A, AU - Auinger,P, AU - Byrd,R S, AU - Weitzman,M, PY - 2000/9/16/pubmed PY - 2000/10/14/medline PY - 2000/9/16/entrez SP - 873 EP - 7 JF - American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine JO - Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. VL - 162 IS - 3 Pt 1 N2 - The Child Health Supplement to the 1988 National Health Interview Survey was used to examine parent-reported current asthma among a nationally representative sample of 17,110 children zero to 17 yr of age. Numerous demographic variables were analyzed for independent associations with asthma using modified stepwise logistic regression, with models including specific combinations of risk factors. Black children had higher rates of asthma than did white children in unadjusted analyses, but after controlling for multiple factors, black race was not a significant correlate of asthma (adjusted odds ratio = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.63 to 1.21). Compared with nonurban white children, urban children, both black and white, were at significantly increased risk of asthma: urban and black (adjusted OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.14 to 1.86), urban and white (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.01 to 1.48), whereas nonurban black children were not: nonurban and black (adjusted OR = 1.15, 95% CI = 0.83 to 1.61). Similarly, compared with nonurban, nonpoor children, urban and poor (adjusted OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.95), urban and nonpoor (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.004 to 1.48), urban children, both poor and nonpoor, were at significantly increased risk of asthma, whereas nonurban poor children were not: nonurban and poor (adjusted OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.72 to 1.48). These results suggest that the higher prevalence of asthma among black children is not due to race or to low income per se, and that all children living in an urban setting are at increased risk for asthma. SN - 1073-449X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10988098/Risk_factors_for_pediatric_asthma__Contributions_of_poverty_race_and_urban_residence_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/ajrccm.162.3.9908085?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -