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Women's lives after an HIV-positive diagnosis: disclosure and violence.
Matern Child Health J. 2000 Jun; 4(2):111-20.MC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

This research addresses four questions: (1) What role do health care providers play in women's disclosure to others of their HIV-positive status? (2) What are women's concerns and experiences with disclosure? (3) What violence do women living with HIV experience? (4) How is the violence related to their diagnosis and disclosures?

METHODS

Participants were 310 HIV-positive women enrolled in an HIV primary care clinic in an urban teaching hospital. Women were interviewed once using both quantitative and qualitative methods.

RESULTS

Women had known they were HIV-positive for an average of 5.8 years; 22% had an HIV-positive partner; 58% had disclosed their status to more than 10 people; and 68% had experienced physical abuse and 32% sexual abuse as an adult. Fifty-seven percent of the sample reported that a health care provider had told them to disclose to their sex partners. Women who were afraid of disclosure-related violence (29%) were significantly more likely than those who were not to report that a health care provider helped them with disclosure (21% vs. 10%). Although 4% reported physical abuse following a disclosure event, 45% reported experiencing emotional, physical, or sexual abuse at some time after their diagnosis. Risk factors for experiencing abuse after diagnosis were a prior history of abuse, drug use, less income, younger age, length of time since diagnosis, and having a partner whose HIV status was negative or unknown.

CONCLUSIONS

Identifying women at risk for abuse after an HIV-positive diagnosis is important for those who provide HIV testing and care. Routine screening for interpersonal violence should be incorporated into HIV posttest counseling and continuing primary care services.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Johns Hopkins University, School of Public Health, Department of Health Policy Management, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA. agielen@jhsph.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

10994579

Citation

Gielen, A C., et al. "Women's Lives After an HIV-positive Diagnosis: Disclosure and Violence." Maternal and Child Health Journal, vol. 4, no. 2, 2000, pp. 111-20.
Gielen AC, McDonnell KA, Burke JG, et al. Women's lives after an HIV-positive diagnosis: disclosure and violence. Matern Child Health J. 2000;4(2):111-20.
Gielen, A. C., McDonnell, K. A., Burke, J. G., & O'Campo, P. (2000). Women's lives after an HIV-positive diagnosis: disclosure and violence. Maternal and Child Health Journal, 4(2), 111-20.
Gielen AC, et al. Women's Lives After an HIV-positive Diagnosis: Disclosure and Violence. Matern Child Health J. 2000;4(2):111-20. PubMed PMID: 10994579.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Women's lives after an HIV-positive diagnosis: disclosure and violence. AU - Gielen,A C, AU - McDonnell,K A, AU - Burke,J G, AU - O'Campo,P, PY - 2000/9/20/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/9/20/entrez SP - 111 EP - 20 JF - Maternal and child health journal JO - Matern Child Health J VL - 4 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: This research addresses four questions: (1) What role do health care providers play in women's disclosure to others of their HIV-positive status? (2) What are women's concerns and experiences with disclosure? (3) What violence do women living with HIV experience? (4) How is the violence related to their diagnosis and disclosures? METHODS: Participants were 310 HIV-positive women enrolled in an HIV primary care clinic in an urban teaching hospital. Women were interviewed once using both quantitative and qualitative methods. RESULTS: Women had known they were HIV-positive for an average of 5.8 years; 22% had an HIV-positive partner; 58% had disclosed their status to more than 10 people; and 68% had experienced physical abuse and 32% sexual abuse as an adult. Fifty-seven percent of the sample reported that a health care provider had told them to disclose to their sex partners. Women who were afraid of disclosure-related violence (29%) were significantly more likely than those who were not to report that a health care provider helped them with disclosure (21% vs. 10%). Although 4% reported physical abuse following a disclosure event, 45% reported experiencing emotional, physical, or sexual abuse at some time after their diagnosis. Risk factors for experiencing abuse after diagnosis were a prior history of abuse, drug use, less income, younger age, length of time since diagnosis, and having a partner whose HIV status was negative or unknown. CONCLUSIONS: Identifying women at risk for abuse after an HIV-positive diagnosis is important for those who provide HIV testing and care. Routine screening for interpersonal violence should be incorporated into HIV posttest counseling and continuing primary care services. SN - 1092-7875 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/10994579/Women's_lives_after_an_HIV_positive_diagnosis:_disclosure_and_violence_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=10994579.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -