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[Transmission and conservation of the amaril virus in nature].
Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1999 Dec; 92(5 Pt 2):435.BS

Abstract

The yellow fever virus is a monkey Flavivirus transmitted by mosquitoes. The transmission cycles and vectors vary from Western to Eastern Africa and in South America. There are two types of endemic areas where the virus is maintained: humid forests and emerging zones and areas where intermediary and urban epidemics occur. On both continents, the virus circulates in forest areas by moving epizooties from one region to another among non immune monkeys. The virus can also be maintained in an enzootic or epidemic zone by vertical transmission from a female to her offspring. This type of transmission was proven experimentally as early as 1903 by Marchoux and Simond for Aedes aegypti, the urban vector of yellow fever, but was observed in nature only in 1995. However, the isolation of the virus in male Ae. furcifer taylori in 1977 in Senegal had already suggested that this kind of transmission took place in nature. The vertical transmission of the yellow fever virus means that it can survive, from one rainy season to the next, in Aedes eggs and thus increases the number of contaminating meals and the proportion of females apt to transmit since they infect at a younger age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

IRD (ex-ORSTOM), Institut Pasteur, Dakar, Sénégal.

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

11000958

Citation

Fontenille, D. "[Transmission and Conservation of the Amaril Virus in Nature]." Bulletin De La Societe De Pathologie Exotique (1990), vol. 92, no. 5 Pt 2, 1999, p. 435.
Fontenille D. [Transmission and conservation of the amaril virus in nature]. Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1999;92(5 Pt 2):435.
Fontenille, D. (1999). [Transmission and conservation of the amaril virus in nature]. Bulletin De La Societe De Pathologie Exotique (1990), 92(5 Pt 2), 435.
Fontenille D. [Transmission and Conservation of the Amaril Virus in Nature]. Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1999;92(5 Pt 2):435. PubMed PMID: 11000958.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Transmission and conservation of the amaril virus in nature]. A1 - Fontenille,D, PY - 2000/9/23/pubmed PY - 2000/10/21/medline PY - 2000/9/23/entrez SP - 435 EP - 435 JF - Bulletin de la Societe de pathologie exotique (1990) JO - Bull Soc Pathol Exot VL - 92 IS - 5 Pt 2 N2 - The yellow fever virus is a monkey Flavivirus transmitted by mosquitoes. The transmission cycles and vectors vary from Western to Eastern Africa and in South America. There are two types of endemic areas where the virus is maintained: humid forests and emerging zones and areas where intermediary and urban epidemics occur. On both continents, the virus circulates in forest areas by moving epizooties from one region to another among non immune monkeys. The virus can also be maintained in an enzootic or epidemic zone by vertical transmission from a female to her offspring. This type of transmission was proven experimentally as early as 1903 by Marchoux and Simond for Aedes aegypti, the urban vector of yellow fever, but was observed in nature only in 1995. However, the isolation of the virus in male Ae. furcifer taylori in 1977 in Senegal had already suggested that this kind of transmission took place in nature. The vertical transmission of the yellow fever virus means that it can survive, from one rainy season to the next, in Aedes eggs and thus increases the number of contaminating meals and the proportion of females apt to transmit since they infect at a younger age. SN - 0037-9085 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11000958/[Transmission_and_conservation_of_the_amaril_virus_in_nature]_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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