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Hazardous hedgehogs.
South Med J. 2000 Sep; 93(9):936-8.SM

Abstract

The African pygmy hedgehog has recently become a fashionable exotic pet in the United States, particularly in the South. As illustrated by the three cases reported, this mammalian insectivore can be a carrier of fungi that cause human dermatomycoses. The African pygmy hedgehog has also been associated with contact urticaria and human salmonellosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, VA Medical Center, Houston, Tex, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11005362

Citation

Rosen, T. "Hazardous Hedgehogs." Southern Medical Journal, vol. 93, no. 9, 2000, pp. 936-8.
Rosen T. Hazardous hedgehogs. South Med J. 2000;93(9):936-8.
Rosen, T. (2000). Hazardous hedgehogs. Southern Medical Journal, 93(9), 936-8.
Rosen T. Hazardous Hedgehogs. South Med J. 2000;93(9):936-8. PubMed PMID: 11005362.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hazardous hedgehogs. A1 - Rosen,T, PY - 2000/9/27/pubmed PY - 2000/10/21/medline PY - 2000/9/27/entrez SP - 936 EP - 8 JF - Southern medical journal JO - South. Med. J. VL - 93 IS - 9 N2 - The African pygmy hedgehog has recently become a fashionable exotic pet in the United States, particularly in the South. As illustrated by the three cases reported, this mammalian insectivore can be a carrier of fungi that cause human dermatomycoses. The African pygmy hedgehog has also been associated with contact urticaria and human salmonellosis. SN - 0038-4348 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11005362/Hazardous_hedgehogs_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=11005362.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -