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Intake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2000 Oct; 72(4):990-7.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Carotenoids may reduce lung carcinogenesis because of their antioxidant properties; however, few studies have examined the relation between intakes of individual carotenoids and lung cancer risk.

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to examine the relation between lung cancer risk and intakes of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, and beta-cryptoxanthin in 2 large cohorts.

DESIGN

During a 10-y follow-up period, 275 new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed in 46924 men; during a 12-y follow-up period, 519 new cases were diagnosed in 77283 women. Carotenoid intakes were derived from the reported consumption of fruit and vegetables on food-frequency questionnaires administered at baseline and during follow-up. The data were analyzed separately for each cohort and the results were pooled to compute overall relative risks (RRs).

RESULTS

In the pooled analyses, alpha-carotene and lycopene intakes were significantly associated with a lower risk of lung cancer; the association with beta-carotene, lutein, and beta-cryptoxanthin intakes were inverse but not significant. Lung cancer risk was significantly lower in subjects who consumed a diet high in a variety of carotenoids (RR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.94 for highest compared with lowest total carotenoid score category). Inverse associations were strongest after a 4-8-y lag between dietary assessment and date of diagnosis. In subjects who never smoked, a 63% lower incidence of lung cancer was observed for the top compared with the bottom quintile of alpha-carotene intake (RR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.77).

CONCLUSION

Data from 2 cohort studies suggest that several carotenoids may reduce the risk of lung cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11010942

Citation

Michaud, D S., et al. "Intake of Specific Carotenoids and Risk of Lung Cancer in 2 Prospective US Cohorts." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 72, no. 4, 2000, pp. 990-7.
Michaud DS, Feskanich D, Rimm EB, et al. Intake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;72(4):990-7.
Michaud, D. S., Feskanich, D., Rimm, E. B., Colditz, G. A., Speizer, F. E., Willett, W. C., & Giovannucci, E. (2000). Intake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 72(4), 990-7.
Michaud DS, et al. Intake of Specific Carotenoids and Risk of Lung Cancer in 2 Prospective US Cohorts. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;72(4):990-7. PubMed PMID: 11010942.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of specific carotenoids and risk of lung cancer in 2 prospective US cohorts. AU - Michaud,D S, AU - Feskanich,D, AU - Rimm,E B, AU - Colditz,G A, AU - Speizer,F E, AU - Willett,W C, AU - Giovannucci,E, PY - 2000/9/30/pubmed PY - 2000/10/21/medline PY - 2000/9/30/entrez SP - 990 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 72 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Carotenoids may reduce lung carcinogenesis because of their antioxidant properties; however, few studies have examined the relation between intakes of individual carotenoids and lung cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to examine the relation between lung cancer risk and intakes of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, lutein, lycopene, and beta-cryptoxanthin in 2 large cohorts. DESIGN: During a 10-y follow-up period, 275 new cases of lung cancer were diagnosed in 46924 men; during a 12-y follow-up period, 519 new cases were diagnosed in 77283 women. Carotenoid intakes were derived from the reported consumption of fruit and vegetables on food-frequency questionnaires administered at baseline and during follow-up. The data were analyzed separately for each cohort and the results were pooled to compute overall relative risks (RRs). RESULTS: In the pooled analyses, alpha-carotene and lycopene intakes were significantly associated with a lower risk of lung cancer; the association with beta-carotene, lutein, and beta-cryptoxanthin intakes were inverse but not significant. Lung cancer risk was significantly lower in subjects who consumed a diet high in a variety of carotenoids (RR: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.94 for highest compared with lowest total carotenoid score category). Inverse associations were strongest after a 4-8-y lag between dietary assessment and date of diagnosis. In subjects who never smoked, a 63% lower incidence of lung cancer was observed for the top compared with the bottom quintile of alpha-carotene intake (RR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.18, 0.77). CONCLUSION: Data from 2 cohort studies suggest that several carotenoids may reduce the risk of lung cancer. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11010942/Intake_of_specific_carotenoids_and_risk_of_lung_cancer_in_2_prospective_US_cohorts_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/72.4.990 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -