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Contact allergy and hand eczema in Swedish dentists.
Contact Dermatitis 2000; 43(4):192-9CD

Abstract

Hand eczema and contact allergy in Swedish dentists were studied in a multidisciplinary project. The aims of the study were to establish diagnoses, to investigate the occurrence of contact allergy, in particular to (meth)acrylates, and to evaluate certain consequences of hand eczema. A postal questionnaire on skin symptoms, atopy and occupational experience was mailed to 3,500 dentists aged <65 years, and licensed 1965-1995. The response rate was 88%. Among dentists living in 3 major cities, 14.9% (n= 191) reported hand eczema during the previous year. They were invited to a clinical examination, including patch testing with a standard and a dental series. 158/191 (83%) dentists attended, and hand eczema diagnosis was confirmed in 149/158 (94%). Irritant contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 67% and allergic contact dermatitis in 28%. On patch testing, 50% presented at least 1 positive reaction. The most frequent allergens were nickel sulfate, fragrance mix, gold sodium thiosulfate and thiuram mix. 7 (5%) had positive reactions to (meth)acrylates, all to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 6 also to ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. 38% had consulted a physician, 4% had been on sick-leave and 1% had changed occupational tasks due to hand eczema. No dentist with allergy to acrylates had been on sick-leave or changed occupation. It is concluded that dentistry is a high-risk occupation for hand eczema, and that irritant contact dermatitis is most common. The prevalence of contact allergy to acrylates was below 1% in the population of responding dentists, and in most cases did not have serious medical, social or occupational consequences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Occupational Dermatology, National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm, Sweden.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11011917

Citation

Wallenhammar, L M., et al. "Contact Allergy and Hand Eczema in Swedish Dentists." Contact Dermatitis, vol. 43, no. 4, 2000, pp. 192-9.
Wallenhammar LM, Ortengren U, Andreasson H, et al. Contact allergy and hand eczema in Swedish dentists. Contact Derm. 2000;43(4):192-9.
Wallenhammar, L. M., Ortengren, U., Andreasson, H., Barregård, L., Björkner, B., Karlsson, S., ... Meding, B. (2000). Contact allergy and hand eczema in Swedish dentists. Contact Dermatitis, 43(4), pp. 192-9.
Wallenhammar LM, et al. Contact Allergy and Hand Eczema in Swedish Dentists. Contact Derm. 2000;43(4):192-9. PubMed PMID: 11011917.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Contact allergy and hand eczema in Swedish dentists. AU - Wallenhammar,L M, AU - Ortengren,U, AU - Andreasson,H, AU - Barregård,L, AU - Björkner,B, AU - Karlsson,S, AU - Wrangsjö,K, AU - Meding,B, PY - 2000/9/30/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/9/30/entrez SP - 192 EP - 9 JF - Contact dermatitis JO - Contact Derm. VL - 43 IS - 4 N2 - Hand eczema and contact allergy in Swedish dentists were studied in a multidisciplinary project. The aims of the study were to establish diagnoses, to investigate the occurrence of contact allergy, in particular to (meth)acrylates, and to evaluate certain consequences of hand eczema. A postal questionnaire on skin symptoms, atopy and occupational experience was mailed to 3,500 dentists aged <65 years, and licensed 1965-1995. The response rate was 88%. Among dentists living in 3 major cities, 14.9% (n= 191) reported hand eczema during the previous year. They were invited to a clinical examination, including patch testing with a standard and a dental series. 158/191 (83%) dentists attended, and hand eczema diagnosis was confirmed in 149/158 (94%). Irritant contact dermatitis was diagnosed in 67% and allergic contact dermatitis in 28%. On patch testing, 50% presented at least 1 positive reaction. The most frequent allergens were nickel sulfate, fragrance mix, gold sodium thiosulfate and thiuram mix. 7 (5%) had positive reactions to (meth)acrylates, all to 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and 6 also to ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. 38% had consulted a physician, 4% had been on sick-leave and 1% had changed occupational tasks due to hand eczema. No dentist with allergy to acrylates had been on sick-leave or changed occupation. It is concluded that dentistry is a high-risk occupation for hand eczema, and that irritant contact dermatitis is most common. The prevalence of contact allergy to acrylates was below 1% in the population of responding dentists, and in most cases did not have serious medical, social or occupational consequences. SN - 0105-1873 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11011917/Contact_allergy_and_hand_eczema_in_Swedish_dentists_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=0105-1873&amp;date=2000&amp;volume=43&amp;issue=4&amp;spage=192 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -