Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

HELLP syndrome.
J Perinat Med. 2000; 28(4):249-60.JP

Abstract

HELLP syndrome is a serious, life-threatening form of pre-eclampsia with a typical laboratory triad. The incidence of the disease is reported as being 0.17-0.85% of all live births. There has been, to date, neither reliable early recognition nor effective prevention of HELLP syndrome. As a result of endothelial dysfunction, activation of intravascular coagulation occurs with fibrin deposition in the capillaries and consecutive microcirculation disorders. The disease manifests itself on average between 32-34 weeks' gestation. HELLP syndrome will occur postpartum in up to 30% of the cases. The clinical cardinal symptom of the disease is right upper quadrant pain or epigastric pain accompanied with nausea, vomiting and malaise. In 20% of the cases with HELLP syndrome there is no hypertension and 5-15% of the pregnant patients present a low level of proteinuria or none at all. The early recognition of hemolysis is most sensitively managed by the determination of the serum haptoglobin. The increase of the aspartate transaminase (AST) and the alanine transaminase (ALT) often precedes a decrease in platelets. The course of HELLP syndrome is incalculable. It is universally agreed that a pregnancy from 32-34 weeks should be immediately delivered. Before 32-34 weeks, expectant management is generally possible in a perinatal center. The frequency for a repeated hypertensive disease in pregnancy ranges from 27% to 48%.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University-Hospital Aachen, Germany. wrath@post.klinikum.rwth-aachen.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11031696

Citation

Rath, W, et al. "HELLP Syndrome." Journal of Perinatal Medicine, vol. 28, no. 4, 2000, pp. 249-60.
Rath W, Faridi A, Dudenhausen JW. HELLP syndrome. J Perinat Med. 2000;28(4):249-60.
Rath, W., Faridi, A., & Dudenhausen, J. W. (2000). HELLP syndrome. Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 28(4), 249-60.
Rath W, Faridi A, Dudenhausen JW. HELLP Syndrome. J Perinat Med. 2000;28(4):249-60. PubMed PMID: 11031696.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HELLP syndrome. AU - Rath,W, AU - Faridi,A, AU - Dudenhausen,J W, PY - 2000/10/14/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/10/14/entrez SP - 249 EP - 60 JF - Journal of perinatal medicine JO - J Perinat Med VL - 28 IS - 4 N2 - HELLP syndrome is a serious, life-threatening form of pre-eclampsia with a typical laboratory triad. The incidence of the disease is reported as being 0.17-0.85% of all live births. There has been, to date, neither reliable early recognition nor effective prevention of HELLP syndrome. As a result of endothelial dysfunction, activation of intravascular coagulation occurs with fibrin deposition in the capillaries and consecutive microcirculation disorders. The disease manifests itself on average between 32-34 weeks' gestation. HELLP syndrome will occur postpartum in up to 30% of the cases. The clinical cardinal symptom of the disease is right upper quadrant pain or epigastric pain accompanied with nausea, vomiting and malaise. In 20% of the cases with HELLP syndrome there is no hypertension and 5-15% of the pregnant patients present a low level of proteinuria or none at all. The early recognition of hemolysis is most sensitively managed by the determination of the serum haptoglobin. The increase of the aspartate transaminase (AST) and the alanine transaminase (ALT) often precedes a decrease in platelets. The course of HELLP syndrome is incalculable. It is universally agreed that a pregnancy from 32-34 weeks should be immediately delivered. Before 32-34 weeks, expectant management is generally possible in a perinatal center. The frequency for a repeated hypertensive disease in pregnancy ranges from 27% to 48%. SN - 0300-5577 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11031696/HELLP_syndrome_ L2 - https://www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/JPM.2000.033 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -