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Ultraviolet light exposure as a risk factor for ocular melanoma in Queensland, Australia.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2000 Sep; 7(3):159-67.OE

Abstract

The state of Queensland, Australia, has one of the highest incidences of cutaneous melanoma in the world; this has been linked to the high sun exposure of the mainly Caucasian population. The role of sun exposure in the development of ocular melanoma (melanoma of the conjunctiva, iris, ciliary body or choroid) remains unclear. A case-control study involving 125 patients with ocular melanoma treated between 1972 and 1996, and 375 age- and sex-matched controls (three for each patient) was performed. A standardised telephone questionnaire examining ultraviolet exposure and other potential risk factors was administered. Cumulative lifetime ocular ultraviolet B (UV-B) exposure was assessed using the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project instrument. Risk factors identified include personal history of melanoma of the skin (odds ratio [OR] 2. 42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88, 6.62) or other skin cancers (OR 1.52, CI 0.99, 2.35), and family history of ocu-lar melanoma (OR 6.89, CI 0.70, 67.38). Protective factors included olive or black skin (OR 0.72, CI 0.40, 1.31), brown iris colour (OR 0.89, CI 0.51, 1.54), high resistance to sunburn (OR 0.58, CI 0.26, 1.31), and wearing prescription glasses (OR 0.78, CI 0.48, 1.25). Sunglass wearing was not found to be protective. Cumulative lifetime ocular UV-B exposure was not found to be a risk factor for ocular melanoma. However, there were too few cases of conjunctival and iris melanoma for these to be analysed as separate sub-groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Wooloongabba, Queensland, Australia.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11035552

Citation

Pane, A R., and L W. Hirst. "Ultraviolet Light Exposure as a Risk Factor for Ocular Melanoma in Queensland, Australia." Ophthalmic Epidemiology, vol. 7, no. 3, 2000, pp. 159-67.
Pane AR, Hirst LW. Ultraviolet light exposure as a risk factor for ocular melanoma in Queensland, Australia. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2000;7(3):159-67.
Pane, A. R., & Hirst, L. W. (2000). Ultraviolet light exposure as a risk factor for ocular melanoma in Queensland, Australia. Ophthalmic Epidemiology, 7(3), 159-67.
Pane AR, Hirst LW. Ultraviolet Light Exposure as a Risk Factor for Ocular Melanoma in Queensland, Australia. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2000;7(3):159-67. PubMed PMID: 11035552.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ultraviolet light exposure as a risk factor for ocular melanoma in Queensland, Australia. AU - Pane,A R, AU - Hirst,L W, PY - 2000/10/18/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/10/18/entrez SP - 159 EP - 67 JF - Ophthalmic epidemiology JO - Ophthalmic Epidemiol VL - 7 IS - 3 N2 - The state of Queensland, Australia, has one of the highest incidences of cutaneous melanoma in the world; this has been linked to the high sun exposure of the mainly Caucasian population. The role of sun exposure in the development of ocular melanoma (melanoma of the conjunctiva, iris, ciliary body or choroid) remains unclear. A case-control study involving 125 patients with ocular melanoma treated between 1972 and 1996, and 375 age- and sex-matched controls (three for each patient) was performed. A standardised telephone questionnaire examining ultraviolet exposure and other potential risk factors was administered. Cumulative lifetime ocular ultraviolet B (UV-B) exposure was assessed using the Melbourne Visual Impairment Project instrument. Risk factors identified include personal history of melanoma of the skin (odds ratio [OR] 2. 42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88, 6.62) or other skin cancers (OR 1.52, CI 0.99, 2.35), and family history of ocu-lar melanoma (OR 6.89, CI 0.70, 67.38). Protective factors included olive or black skin (OR 0.72, CI 0.40, 1.31), brown iris colour (OR 0.89, CI 0.51, 1.54), high resistance to sunburn (OR 0.58, CI 0.26, 1.31), and wearing prescription glasses (OR 0.78, CI 0.48, 1.25). Sunglass wearing was not found to be protective. Cumulative lifetime ocular UV-B exposure was not found to be a risk factor for ocular melanoma. However, there were too few cases of conjunctival and iris melanoma for these to be analysed as separate sub-groups. SN - 0928-6586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11035552/Ultraviolet_light_exposure_as_a_risk_factor_for_ocular_melanoma_in_Queensland_Australia_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5296 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -