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Long-term outcome and treatment modifications in a prospective cohort of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients on triple-drug antiretroviral regimens. Triest Cohort Investigators.
Clin Infect Dis. 2000 Oct; 31(4):987-94.CI

Abstract

We designed a cohort in order to assess the long-term effects of triple-drug antiretroviral combinations in 608 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We recruited patients who had been previously treated with nucleoside analogues as well as treatment-naive patients who were starting triple-drug antiretroviral combinations consisting of nucleoside analogues, either alone or in combination with a protease inhibitor. After a median follow-up time of 22 months, the incidence rates of acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining events and death were, respectively, 6.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3-8.8) and 2.9 (95% CI, 1.9-4.2) per 100 person-years. Advanced clinical stage of disease (P=.004), a low CD4(+) cell count (P=.002), and a low quality-of-life score (P=.001) at baseline were independent predictors of clinical progression. The initial triple-drug combination was modified a total of 647 times in 321 patients. The only independent predictor of treatment modification was previous exposure to a nucleoside analogue in patients who did not receive a new nucleoside analogue at inclusion (P=.001). Plasma HIV RNA values below 500 copies/mL were obtained in 88% of the treatment-naive patients and in 57% of the previously treated patients (P<.001). Compared with previously treated patients who received > or = 1 new nucleoside analogue at enrollment, previously treated patients who did not receive a new nucleoside analogue at enrollment were twice as likely to have plasma HIV RNA values >500 copies/mL at the last visit (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-2.8), and the antiretroviral-naive patients were significantly less likely to have plasma HIV RNA values >500 copies/mL at the last visit (adjusted OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.4).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service des Maladies Infectieuses, Hopital Rothschild, Paris, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11049781

Citation

Girard, P M., et al. "Long-term Outcome and Treatment Modifications in a Prospective Cohort of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-infected Patients On Triple-drug Antiretroviral Regimens. Triest Cohort Investigators." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 31, no. 4, 2000, pp. 987-94.
Girard PM, Guiguet M, Bollens D, et al. Long-term outcome and treatment modifications in a prospective cohort of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients on triple-drug antiretroviral regimens. Triest Cohort Investigators. Clin Infect Dis. 2000;31(4):987-94.
Girard, P. M., Guiguet, M., Bollens, D., Goderel, I., Meyohas, M. C., Lecomte, I., Raguin, G., Frottier, J., Rozenbaum, W., & Jaillon, P. (2000). Long-term outcome and treatment modifications in a prospective cohort of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients on triple-drug antiretroviral regimens. Triest Cohort Investigators. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 31(4), 987-94.
Girard PM, et al. Long-term Outcome and Treatment Modifications in a Prospective Cohort of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-infected Patients On Triple-drug Antiretroviral Regimens. Triest Cohort Investigators. Clin Infect Dis. 2000;31(4):987-94. PubMed PMID: 11049781.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term outcome and treatment modifications in a prospective cohort of human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients on triple-drug antiretroviral regimens. Triest Cohort Investigators. AU - Girard,P M, AU - Guiguet,M, AU - Bollens,D, AU - Goderel,I, AU - Meyohas,M C, AU - Lecomte,I, AU - Raguin,G, AU - Frottier,J, AU - Rozenbaum,W, AU - Jaillon,P, Y1 - 2000/10/25/ PY - 1999/11/29/received PY - 2000/03/22/revised PY - 2000/10/26/pubmed PY - 2001/3/3/medline PY - 2000/10/26/entrez SP - 987 EP - 94 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 31 IS - 4 N2 - We designed a cohort in order to assess the long-term effects of triple-drug antiretroviral combinations in 608 patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). We recruited patients who had been previously treated with nucleoside analogues as well as treatment-naive patients who were starting triple-drug antiretroviral combinations consisting of nucleoside analogues, either alone or in combination with a protease inhibitor. After a median follow-up time of 22 months, the incidence rates of acquired immune deficiency syndrome-defining events and death were, respectively, 6.9 (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.3-8.8) and 2.9 (95% CI, 1.9-4.2) per 100 person-years. Advanced clinical stage of disease (P=.004), a low CD4(+) cell count (P=.002), and a low quality-of-life score (P=.001) at baseline were independent predictors of clinical progression. The initial triple-drug combination was modified a total of 647 times in 321 patients. The only independent predictor of treatment modification was previous exposure to a nucleoside analogue in patients who did not receive a new nucleoside analogue at inclusion (P=.001). Plasma HIV RNA values below 500 copies/mL were obtained in 88% of the treatment-naive patients and in 57% of the previously treated patients (P<.001). Compared with previously treated patients who received > or = 1 new nucleoside analogue at enrollment, previously treated patients who did not receive a new nucleoside analogue at enrollment were twice as likely to have plasma HIV RNA values >500 copies/mL at the last visit (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-2.8), and the antiretroviral-naive patients were significantly less likely to have plasma HIV RNA values >500 copies/mL at the last visit (adjusted OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.1-0.4). SN - 1058-4838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11049781/Long_term_outcome_and_treatment_modifications_in_a_prospective_cohort_of_human_immunodeficiency_virus_type_1_infected_patients_on_triple_drug_antiretroviral_regimens__Triest_Cohort_Investigators_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/318154 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -