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Differences in pressures of the popliteal, long saphenous, and dorsal foot veins.
J Vasc Surg. 2000 Nov; 32(5):894-901.JV

Abstract

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among pressures obtained simultaneously in the popliteal, long saphenous, and dorsal foot veins.

METHOD

Eight limbs were studied. One limb had an isolated popliteal vein reflux, and two had moderate long saphenous vein incompetence. No perforator or short saphenous vein insufficiency was detected. Pressures and recovery times of the popliteal/tibial and long saphenous veins were obtained with cannulation at the ankle level and insertion of catheters with a pressure transducer tip. The dorsal foot vein pressure was measured with the insertion of a scalp needle (14-gauge) connected to an external transducer. During 10 toe stands, recordings were simultaneously made in the three veins at the level of the knee joint, in the middle third of the calf, and 5 to 7 cm above the ankle with all the transducers at the same level (ie, same reference point).

RESULTS

In one limb the popliteal/tibial pressure increased at all calf levels, whereas pressures decreased in both saphenous and dorsal foot veins. The pressures decreased in all three systems in the remaining seven limbs. There was no statistical difference between the pressure drop in the long saphenous vein and the deep vein. However, the decrease of the dorsal foot venous pressure was significantly more marked compared with the other two veins at all levels. The recovery time was significantly increased in the long saphenous vein compared with the deep vein; recovery time was further prolonged in the dorsal foot vein.

CONCLUSION

The dorsal foot, long saphenous, and popliteal/posterior tibial veins clearly exhibit different pressure waveforms in response to calf exercise. The postexercise pressure, the percentage pressure drop, and the recovery times are widely different, which indicates that the three veins behave hydraulically as separate compartments in limbs without significant venous insufficiency.

Authors+Show Affiliations

River Oaks Hospital, Jackson, MS, USA. pepane@hotmail.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11054221

Citation

Neglén, P, and S Raju. "Differences in Pressures of the Popliteal, Long Saphenous, and Dorsal Foot Veins." Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 32, no. 5, 2000, pp. 894-901.
Neglén P, Raju S. Differences in pressures of the popliteal, long saphenous, and dorsal foot veins. J Vasc Surg. 2000;32(5):894-901.
Neglén, P., & Raju, S. (2000). Differences in pressures of the popliteal, long saphenous, and dorsal foot veins. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 32(5), 894-901.
Neglén P, Raju S. Differences in Pressures of the Popliteal, Long Saphenous, and Dorsal Foot Veins. J Vasc Surg. 2000;32(5):894-901. PubMed PMID: 11054221.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differences in pressures of the popliteal, long saphenous, and dorsal foot veins. AU - Neglén,P, AU - Raju,S, PY - 2000/10/29/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/10/29/entrez SP - 894 EP - 901 JF - Journal of vascular surgery JO - J Vasc Surg VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among pressures obtained simultaneously in the popliteal, long saphenous, and dorsal foot veins. METHOD: Eight limbs were studied. One limb had an isolated popliteal vein reflux, and two had moderate long saphenous vein incompetence. No perforator or short saphenous vein insufficiency was detected. Pressures and recovery times of the popliteal/tibial and long saphenous veins were obtained with cannulation at the ankle level and insertion of catheters with a pressure transducer tip. The dorsal foot vein pressure was measured with the insertion of a scalp needle (14-gauge) connected to an external transducer. During 10 toe stands, recordings were simultaneously made in the three veins at the level of the knee joint, in the middle third of the calf, and 5 to 7 cm above the ankle with all the transducers at the same level (ie, same reference point). RESULTS: In one limb the popliteal/tibial pressure increased at all calf levels, whereas pressures decreased in both saphenous and dorsal foot veins. The pressures decreased in all three systems in the remaining seven limbs. There was no statistical difference between the pressure drop in the long saphenous vein and the deep vein. However, the decrease of the dorsal foot venous pressure was significantly more marked compared with the other two veins at all levels. The recovery time was significantly increased in the long saphenous vein compared with the deep vein; recovery time was further prolonged in the dorsal foot vein. CONCLUSION: The dorsal foot, long saphenous, and popliteal/posterior tibial veins clearly exhibit different pressure waveforms in response to calf exercise. The postexercise pressure, the percentage pressure drop, and the recovery times are widely different, which indicates that the three veins behave hydraulically as separate compartments in limbs without significant venous insufficiency. SN - 0741-5214 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11054221/Differences_in_pressures_of_the_popliteal_long_saphenous_and_dorsal_foot_veins_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0741-5214(00)03902-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -