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The relationship between lower limb symptoms and superficial and deep venous reflux on duplex ultrasonography: The Edinburgh Vein Study.
J Vasc Surg 2000; 32(5):921-31JV

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous work from this group has demonstrated the relationships between lower limb symptoms and the presence and severity of trunk varicose veins as seen on clinical examination to be generally weak, symptom specific, and gender dependent.

OBJECTIVE

This study was undertaken to investigate the relationships in the general population between lower limb symptoms and the presence of superficial or deep venous reflux.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study was made of an age-stratified random sample of 1566 subjects (699 men and 867 women) aged 18 to 64 selected from 12 general practices in Edinburgh, Scotland. Subjects completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding symptoms (heaviness/tension, a feeling of swelling, aching, restless legs, cramps, itching, tingling) and underwent duplex ultrasound examination of the superficial and deep venous systems of both legs. Reflux of 0.5 seconds or greater was considered pathologic. Deep venous reflux was defined as reflux in at least the popliteal vein.

RESULTS

There was a significant positive relationship between isolated superficial reflux and the presence of heaviness/tension (P <.025, both legs) and itching (P =.002, left leg) in women. Isolated superficial reflux in men was not significantly positively associated with any symptom. Isolated deep venous reflux was not significantly related to any symptom in either leg in either sex. Combined reflux was related to a feeling of swelling (P =.018, right leg; P =.0022, left leg), cramps (P =.0049, left leg) and itching (P =.0043, left leg) in men, and aching (P =.03, right leg) and cramps (P =.026, left leg) in women.

CONCLUSION

In the general population, only certain lower limb symptoms were related to the presence of reflux on duplex ultrasound scanning. The strongest relationships were observed in the left legs of men with combined superficial and deep reflux.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University Department of Vascular Surgery, Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, England, UK. andrew.bradbury@btinternet.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11054224

Citation

Bradbury, A, et al. "The Relationship Between Lower Limb Symptoms and Superficial and Deep Venous Reflux On Duplex Ultrasonography: the Edinburgh Vein Study." Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 32, no. 5, 2000, pp. 921-31.
Bradbury A, Evans CJ, Allan P, et al. The relationship between lower limb symptoms and superficial and deep venous reflux on duplex ultrasonography: The Edinburgh Vein Study. J Vasc Surg. 2000;32(5):921-31.
Bradbury, A., Evans, C. J., Allan, P., Lee, A. J., Ruckley, C. V., & Fowkes, F. G. (2000). The relationship between lower limb symptoms and superficial and deep venous reflux on duplex ultrasonography: The Edinburgh Vein Study. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 32(5), pp. 921-31.
Bradbury A, et al. The Relationship Between Lower Limb Symptoms and Superficial and Deep Venous Reflux On Duplex Ultrasonography: the Edinburgh Vein Study. J Vasc Surg. 2000;32(5):921-31. PubMed PMID: 11054224.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relationship between lower limb symptoms and superficial and deep venous reflux on duplex ultrasonography: The Edinburgh Vein Study. AU - Bradbury,A, AU - Evans,C J, AU - Allan,P, AU - Lee,A J, AU - Ruckley,C V, AU - Fowkes,F G, PY - 2000/10/29/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/10/29/entrez SP - 921 EP - 31 JF - Journal of vascular surgery JO - J. Vasc. Surg. VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous work from this group has demonstrated the relationships between lower limb symptoms and the presence and severity of trunk varicose veins as seen on clinical examination to be generally weak, symptom specific, and gender dependent. OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to investigate the relationships in the general population between lower limb symptoms and the presence of superficial or deep venous reflux. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was made of an age-stratified random sample of 1566 subjects (699 men and 867 women) aged 18 to 64 selected from 12 general practices in Edinburgh, Scotland. Subjects completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding symptoms (heaviness/tension, a feeling of swelling, aching, restless legs, cramps, itching, tingling) and underwent duplex ultrasound examination of the superficial and deep venous systems of both legs. Reflux of 0.5 seconds or greater was considered pathologic. Deep venous reflux was defined as reflux in at least the popliteal vein. RESULTS: There was a significant positive relationship between isolated superficial reflux and the presence of heaviness/tension (P <.025, both legs) and itching (P =.002, left leg) in women. Isolated superficial reflux in men was not significantly positively associated with any symptom. Isolated deep venous reflux was not significantly related to any symptom in either leg in either sex. Combined reflux was related to a feeling of swelling (P =.018, right leg; P =.0022, left leg), cramps (P =.0049, left leg) and itching (P =.0043, left leg) in men, and aching (P =.03, right leg) and cramps (P =.026, left leg) in women. CONCLUSION: In the general population, only certain lower limb symptoms were related to the presence of reflux on duplex ultrasound scanning. The strongest relationships were observed in the left legs of men with combined superficial and deep reflux. SN - 0741-5214 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11054224/The_relationship_between_lower_limb_symptoms_and_superficial_and_deep_venous_reflux_on_duplex_ultrasonography:_The_Edinburgh_Vein_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0741-5214(00)31454-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -