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Exposure to violence and victimization, depression, substance use, and the use of violence by young adolescents.
J Pediatr. 2000 Nov; 137(5):707-13.JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relationships among exposure to violence; tobacco, alcohol, and other substance use; depression; church attendance; and the use of violence among very young adolescents.

METHODS

An 86-item confidential questionnaire was administered to 722 sixth grade students (mean age = 11.9+/-0.8 years) attending 4 middle schools serving neighborhoods in and around public housing.

RESULTS

Boys had a higher mean violence scale score than girls (P < or =.0001), and students living in public housing had higher violence scale scores than other students (P< or =.0001). Self-reported use of violence was significantly associated with exposure to violence (r =.45); age (r =.28); frequency of church attendance (r = -.14); depression (r =.28); the probability of being alive at age 25 (r = -.09); the frequency of use of cigarettes (r =.39), alcohol (r =.37), and multiple substances (r =.38); and interest in a gang (r =.37). When all of these variables were analyzed with multiple linear regression, multiple substance use, exposure to violence, interest in a gang, male gender, cigarette smoking, and depression level accounted for 49.7% of the variation in the use of violence scale.

CONCLUSION

Recent multiple substance use and lifetime exposure to violence and victimization were the strongest correlates with the frequency that these youth reported using violence and carrying weapons.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, The Brenner Center for Child and Adolescent Health, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11060539

Citation

Durant, R H., et al. "Exposure to Violence and Victimization, Depression, Substance Use, and the Use of Violence By Young Adolescents." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 137, no. 5, 2000, pp. 707-13.
Durant RH, Altman D, Wolfson M, et al. Exposure to violence and victimization, depression, substance use, and the use of violence by young adolescents. J Pediatr. 2000;137(5):707-13.
Durant, R. H., Altman, D., Wolfson, M., Barkin, S., Kreiter, S., & Krowchuk, D. (2000). Exposure to violence and victimization, depression, substance use, and the use of violence by young adolescents. The Journal of Pediatrics, 137(5), 707-13.
Durant RH, et al. Exposure to Violence and Victimization, Depression, Substance Use, and the Use of Violence By Young Adolescents. J Pediatr. 2000;137(5):707-13. PubMed PMID: 11060539.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure to violence and victimization, depression, substance use, and the use of violence by young adolescents. AU - Durant,R H, AU - Altman,D, AU - Wolfson,M, AU - Barkin,S, AU - Kreiter,S, AU - Krowchuk,D, PY - 2000/11/4/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/11/4/entrez SP - 707 EP - 13 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J Pediatr VL - 137 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationships among exposure to violence; tobacco, alcohol, and other substance use; depression; church attendance; and the use of violence among very young adolescents. METHODS: An 86-item confidential questionnaire was administered to 722 sixth grade students (mean age = 11.9+/-0.8 years) attending 4 middle schools serving neighborhoods in and around public housing. RESULTS: Boys had a higher mean violence scale score than girls (P < or =.0001), and students living in public housing had higher violence scale scores than other students (P< or =.0001). Self-reported use of violence was significantly associated with exposure to violence (r =.45); age (r =.28); frequency of church attendance (r = -.14); depression (r =.28); the probability of being alive at age 25 (r = -.09); the frequency of use of cigarettes (r =.39), alcohol (r =.37), and multiple substances (r =.38); and interest in a gang (r =.37). When all of these variables were analyzed with multiple linear regression, multiple substance use, exposure to violence, interest in a gang, male gender, cigarette smoking, and depression level accounted for 49.7% of the variation in the use of violence scale. CONCLUSION: Recent multiple substance use and lifetime exposure to violence and victimization were the strongest correlates with the frequency that these youth reported using violence and carrying weapons. SN - 0022-3476 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11060539/Exposure_to_violence_and_victimization_depression_substance_use_and_the_use_of_violence_by_young_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(00)82708-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -