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Expressed emotion, parenting stress, and adjustment in mothers of young children with behavior problems.
J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000 Oct; 41(7):907-15.JC

Abstract

Expressed Emotion (EE), a measure of the emotional climate of the family, predicts subsequent adjustment of adults with mental disorder (Leff & Vaughn, 1985). Despite the acknowledged importance of the family in childhood disorders, there have been relatively few studies of expressed emotion with adolescents and school-aged children and virtually none focused on preschoolers. The present study utilized the Five Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) to examine how Expressed Emotion relates concurrently and longitudinally to child problem status in a community sample of 112 preschool-aged children. At preschool, the proportion of high EE increased significantly across three child groups: Comparison (8.1%), Borderline Problem (15.8%), and High Problem (41.2%); however, preschool EE was not predictive of subsequent child status at 1st grade. Expanded FMSS codes. tapping positive affect and worry about the child, were also related to child problem group at preschool and were predictive of subsequent child status at 1st grade. Because parents' stress and adjustment were also highly related to child problem group status, we examined whether the FMSS codes were essentially a proxy for these or whether they explained unique variance. In two stepwise regressions on preschool child group status (divided by total problems and by externalizing problems), maternal stress was the only variable to enter. Also, in predicting to 1st grade externalizing child group status, only maternal stress entered. Discussion focused on the extension of the EE construct and other FMSS coding to young children, and the need to recognize that to some extent these variables may reflect maternal stress and adjustment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Baker@psych.ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11079433

Citation

Baker, B L., et al. "Expressed Emotion, Parenting Stress, and Adjustment in Mothers of Young Children With Behavior Problems." Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, vol. 41, no. 7, 2000, pp. 907-15.
Baker BL, Heller TL, Henker B. Expressed emotion, parenting stress, and adjustment in mothers of young children with behavior problems. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000;41(7):907-15.
Baker, B. L., Heller, T. L., & Henker, B. (2000). Expressed emotion, parenting stress, and adjustment in mothers of young children with behavior problems. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, and Allied Disciplines, 41(7), 907-15.
Baker BL, Heller TL, Henker B. Expressed Emotion, Parenting Stress, and Adjustment in Mothers of Young Children With Behavior Problems. J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 2000;41(7):907-15. PubMed PMID: 11079433.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Expressed emotion, parenting stress, and adjustment in mothers of young children with behavior problems. AU - Baker,B L, AU - Heller,T L, AU - Henker,B, PY - 2000/11/18/pubmed PY - 2001/3/3/medline PY - 2000/11/18/entrez SP - 907 EP - 15 JF - Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines JO - J Child Psychol Psychiatry VL - 41 IS - 7 N2 - Expressed Emotion (EE), a measure of the emotional climate of the family, predicts subsequent adjustment of adults with mental disorder (Leff & Vaughn, 1985). Despite the acknowledged importance of the family in childhood disorders, there have been relatively few studies of expressed emotion with adolescents and school-aged children and virtually none focused on preschoolers. The present study utilized the Five Minute Speech Sample (FMSS) to examine how Expressed Emotion relates concurrently and longitudinally to child problem status in a community sample of 112 preschool-aged children. At preschool, the proportion of high EE increased significantly across three child groups: Comparison (8.1%), Borderline Problem (15.8%), and High Problem (41.2%); however, preschool EE was not predictive of subsequent child status at 1st grade. Expanded FMSS codes. tapping positive affect and worry about the child, were also related to child problem group at preschool and were predictive of subsequent child status at 1st grade. Because parents' stress and adjustment were also highly related to child problem group status, we examined whether the FMSS codes were essentially a proxy for these or whether they explained unique variance. In two stepwise regressions on preschool child group status (divided by total problems and by externalizing problems), maternal stress was the only variable to enter. Also, in predicting to 1st grade externalizing child group status, only maternal stress entered. Discussion focused on the extension of the EE construct and other FMSS coding to young children, and the need to recognize that to some extent these variables may reflect maternal stress and adjustment. SN - 0021-9630 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11079433/Expressed_emotion_parenting_stress_and_adjustment_in_mothers_of_young_children_with_behavior_problems_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0021-9630&date=2000&volume=41&issue=7&spage=907 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -