Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Male circumcision and risk of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
AIDS. 2000 Oct 20; 14(15):2361-70.AIDS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To systematically review studies of male circumcision and the risk of HIV-1 infection in men in sub-Saharan Africa, and to summarize the findings in a meta-analysis.

DESIGN

A meta-analysis of observational studies.

METHODS

A systematic literature review was carried out of studies published up to April 1999 that included circumcision as a risk factor for HIV-1 infection among men in sub-Saharan Africa. A random effects meta-analysis was used to calculate a pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for all studies combined, and stratified by type of study population. Further analyses were conducted among those studies that adjusted for potential confounding factors.

RESULTS

Twenty-seven studies were included. Of these, 21 showed a reduced risk of HIV among circumcised men, being approximately half that in uncircumcised men (crude RR = 0.52, CI 0.40-0.68). In 15 studies that adjusted for potential confounding factors, the association was even stronger (adjusted RR = 0.42, CI 0.34-0.54). The association was stronger among men at high risk of HIV (crude RR = 0.27; adjusted RR = 0.29, CI 0.20-0.41) than among men in general populations (crude RR = 0.93; adjusted RR = 0.56, CI 0.44-0.70).

CONCLUSION

Male circumcision is associated with a significantly reduced risk of HIV infection among men in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly those at high risk of HIV. These results suggest that consideration should be given to the acceptability and feasibility of providing safe services for male circumcision as an additional HIV prevention strategy in areas of Africa where men are not traditionally circumcised.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical Research Council Tropical Epidemiology Group, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11089625

Citation

Weiss, H A., et al. "Male Circumcision and Risk of HIV Infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis." AIDS (London, England), vol. 14, no. 15, 2000, pp. 2361-70.
Weiss HA, Quigley MA, Hayes RJ. Male circumcision and risk of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AIDS. 2000;14(15):2361-70.
Weiss, H. A., Quigley, M. A., & Hayes, R. J. (2000). Male circumcision and risk of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AIDS (London, England), 14(15), 2361-70.
Weiss HA, Quigley MA, Hayes RJ. Male Circumcision and Risk of HIV Infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. AIDS. 2000 Oct 20;14(15):2361-70. PubMed PMID: 11089625.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Male circumcision and risk of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis. AU - Weiss,H A, AU - Quigley,M A, AU - Hayes,R J, PY - 2000/11/23/pubmed PY - 2001/3/17/medline PY - 2000/11/23/entrez SP - 2361 EP - 70 JF - AIDS (London, England) JO - AIDS VL - 14 IS - 15 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To systematically review studies of male circumcision and the risk of HIV-1 infection in men in sub-Saharan Africa, and to summarize the findings in a meta-analysis. DESIGN: A meta-analysis of observational studies. METHODS: A systematic literature review was carried out of studies published up to April 1999 that included circumcision as a risk factor for HIV-1 infection among men in sub-Saharan Africa. A random effects meta-analysis was used to calculate a pooled relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for all studies combined, and stratified by type of study population. Further analyses were conducted among those studies that adjusted for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies were included. Of these, 21 showed a reduced risk of HIV among circumcised men, being approximately half that in uncircumcised men (crude RR = 0.52, CI 0.40-0.68). In 15 studies that adjusted for potential confounding factors, the association was even stronger (adjusted RR = 0.42, CI 0.34-0.54). The association was stronger among men at high risk of HIV (crude RR = 0.27; adjusted RR = 0.29, CI 0.20-0.41) than among men in general populations (crude RR = 0.93; adjusted RR = 0.56, CI 0.44-0.70). CONCLUSION: Male circumcision is associated with a significantly reduced risk of HIV infection among men in sub-Saharan Africa, particularly those at high risk of HIV. These results suggest that consideration should be given to the acceptability and feasibility of providing safe services for male circumcision as an additional HIV prevention strategy in areas of Africa where men are not traditionally circumcised. SN - 0269-9370 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11089625/Male_circumcision_and_risk_of_HIV_infection_in_sub_Saharan_Africa:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00002030-200010200-00018 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -