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Keloids in rural black South Africans. Part 2: dietary fatty acid intake and total phospholipid fatty acid profile in the blood of keloid patients.

Abstract

In the second part of this study, emphasis is placed on nutritional intakes (fatty acids and micronutrients) and fatty acid intake and metabolism in the blood, respectively, according to a combined 24 h recall and standardized food frequency questionnaire analyses of keloid prone patients (n=10), compared with normal black South Africans (n=80), and total phospholipid blood (plasma and red blood cell ) analyses of keloid patients (n=20), compared with normal individuals (n=20). Lipid extraction and fractionation by standard procedures, total phospholipid (TPL) separation with thin layer chromatography, and fatty acid methyl ester analyses with gas liquid chromatography techniques were used. Since nutrition may play a role in several disease disorders, the purpose of this study was to confirm or refute a role for essential fatty acids (EFAs) in the hypothesis of keloid formations stated in part 1 of this study. (1)According to the Canadian recommendation (1991), we observed that in keloid patients linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA) dietary intakes, as EFAs of the omega-6-series, are higher than the recommended 7-11 g/d. However, the a-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) dietary intakes, as EFAs of the omega-3 series, are lower than the recommendation of 1.1-1.5 g/d. This was also the case in the control group, where a higher dietary intake of the omega-6 fatty acids and a slightly lower dietary intake of the omega-3 fatty acids occurred. Thus, we confirm a high dietary intake of LA (as a product of organ meats, diary products and many vegetable oils) and AA (as a product of meats and egg yolks), as well as lower dietary intakes of ALA (as a product of grains, green leafy vegetables, soy oil, rapeseed oil and linseed), and EPA and DHA (as products of marine oils). Lower micronutrient intakes than the recommended dietary allowances were observed in the keloid group that may influence EFA metabolism and/or collagen synthesis. Of cardinal importance may be the lower intake of calcium in the keloid patients that may contribute to abnormal cell signal transduction in fibroblasts and consequent collagen overproduction, and the lower copper intake that may influence the immune system, or perhaps even the high magnesium intake that stimulates metabolic activity. Micronutrient deficiencies also occurred in the diets of the normal black South Africans that served as a control group. In the case of plasma TPLs, deficiency of the omega-3 EFA series (ALA, EPA and DHA) occurred, and this is in accordance with the apparent lower omega-3 EFA intake in the diets of these patients. In the case of the red blood cell TPLs, as a true and reliable source of dietary fatty acid intake and metabolism, sufficient EFAs of the omega-6 series (LA and AA) and the omega-3 series (ALA, EPA and DHA) occurred. For this study group a relative deficiency of nutritional omega-3 EFA intake apparently did occur, but was probably compensated for by blood fatty acid metabolism.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Anatomy and Cell Morphology, University of the Orange Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    African Continental Ancestry Group
    Arachidonic Acid
    Case-Control Studies
    Chromatography, Thin Layer
    Diet
    Docosahexaenoic Acids
    Eicosapentaenoic Acid
    Fatty Acids
    Female
    Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
    Humans
    Keloid
    Linoleic Acid
    Male
    Phospholipids
    Rural Population
    Signal Transduction
    South Africa
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11090250

    Citation

    Louw, L, and A Dannhauser. "Keloids in Rural Black South Africans. Part 2: Dietary Fatty Acid Intake and Total Phospholipid Fatty Acid Profile in the Blood of Keloid Patients." Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, vol. 63, no. 5, 2000, pp. 247-53.
    Louw L, Dannhauser A. Keloids in rural black South Africans. Part 2: dietary fatty acid intake and total phospholipid fatty acid profile in the blood of keloid patients. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2000;63(5):247-53.
    Louw, L., & Dannhauser, A. (2000). Keloids in rural black South Africans. Part 2: dietary fatty acid intake and total phospholipid fatty acid profile in the blood of keloid patients. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, 63(5), pp. 247-53.
    Louw L, Dannhauser A. Keloids in Rural Black South Africans. Part 2: Dietary Fatty Acid Intake and Total Phospholipid Fatty Acid Profile in the Blood of Keloid Patients. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 2000;63(5):247-53. PubMed PMID: 11090250.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Keloids in rural black South Africans. Part 2: dietary fatty acid intake and total phospholipid fatty acid profile in the blood of keloid patients. AU - Louw,L, AU - Dannhauser,A, PY - 2000/11/25/pubmed PY - 2001/3/3/medline PY - 2000/11/25/entrez SP - 247 EP - 53 JF - Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids JO - Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids VL - 63 IS - 5 N2 - In the second part of this study, emphasis is placed on nutritional intakes (fatty acids and micronutrients) and fatty acid intake and metabolism in the blood, respectively, according to a combined 24 h recall and standardized food frequency questionnaire analyses of keloid prone patients (n=10), compared with normal black South Africans (n=80), and total phospholipid blood (plasma and red blood cell ) analyses of keloid patients (n=20), compared with normal individuals (n=20). Lipid extraction and fractionation by standard procedures, total phospholipid (TPL) separation with thin layer chromatography, and fatty acid methyl ester analyses with gas liquid chromatography techniques were used. Since nutrition may play a role in several disease disorders, the purpose of this study was to confirm or refute a role for essential fatty acids (EFAs) in the hypothesis of keloid formations stated in part 1 of this study. (1)According to the Canadian recommendation (1991), we observed that in keloid patients linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA) dietary intakes, as EFAs of the omega-6-series, are higher than the recommended 7-11 g/d. However, the a-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) dietary intakes, as EFAs of the omega-3 series, are lower than the recommendation of 1.1-1.5 g/d. This was also the case in the control group, where a higher dietary intake of the omega-6 fatty acids and a slightly lower dietary intake of the omega-3 fatty acids occurred. Thus, we confirm a high dietary intake of LA (as a product of organ meats, diary products and many vegetable oils) and AA (as a product of meats and egg yolks), as well as lower dietary intakes of ALA (as a product of grains, green leafy vegetables, soy oil, rapeseed oil and linseed), and EPA and DHA (as products of marine oils). Lower micronutrient intakes than the recommended dietary allowances were observed in the keloid group that may influence EFA metabolism and/or collagen synthesis. Of cardinal importance may be the lower intake of calcium in the keloid patients that may contribute to abnormal cell signal transduction in fibroblasts and consequent collagen overproduction, and the lower copper intake that may influence the immune system, or perhaps even the high magnesium intake that stimulates metabolic activity. Micronutrient deficiencies also occurred in the diets of the normal black South Africans that served as a control group. In the case of plasma TPLs, deficiency of the omega-3 EFA series (ALA, EPA and DHA) occurred, and this is in accordance with the apparent lower omega-3 EFA intake in the diets of these patients. In the case of the red blood cell TPLs, as a true and reliable source of dietary fatty acid intake and metabolism, sufficient EFAs of the omega-6 series (LA and AA) and the omega-3 series (ALA, EPA and DHA) occurred. For this study group a relative deficiency of nutritional omega-3 EFA intake apparently did occur, but was probably compensated for by blood fatty acid metabolism. SN - 0952-3278 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11090250/Keloids_in_rural_black_South_Africans__Part_2:_dietary_fatty_acid_intake_and_total_phospholipid_fatty_acid_profile_in_the_blood_of_keloid_patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0952-3278(00)90208-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -