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Subcutaneous central fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors in men independently of total fatness and fitness.
Metabolism. 2000 Nov; 49(11):1379-85.M

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyze the single and independent associations of whole body composition and fat distribution with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and fitness in middle-aged men. Sixty-two healthy Caucasian men (37.6 +/- 2.9 yr, 81.8 +/- 11.3 kg, 171.5 +/- 4.9 cm) participated in the study. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to assess total and regional body composition. The triceps, biceps, midthigh, calf, subscapular, chest, abdominal and suprailiac skinfolds, and the waist, hip and midthigh circumferences, and sagittal diameter were estimated. Cardiovascular fitness was estimated with a submaximal test. Bivariate and partial correlation analysis were used to study the association of total body percent fat (%fat), DXA trunk fat and trunk skinfolds (sum of subscapular, chest, abdominal, and suprailiac) and fitness with insulin, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), TC/HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), apolipoprotein AI (apo AI), apolipoprotein B (apo B), lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], and diastolic and systolic blood pressure. All anthropometric and DXA body composition variables were significantly correlated with TC/HDL-C (from .26 to .50, P < .05). Similar relationships were found for insulin, HDL-C, and systolic blood pressure (r from .26 to .47, P < .05). Cardiovascular fitness was significantly (P < .05) associated with insulin (r = -.36), HDL-C (r = .27), TC/HDL (r = -.27), and with systolic blood pressure (r = -.37). After controlling for trunk skinfolds, none of the anthropometric and DXA body composition variables were correlated with any of the CVD risk factors. Similarly, when controlling for trunk skinfolds, cardiovascular fitness was not related to any of the metabolic variables. After adjusting for %fat, DXA trunk fat, and cardiovascular fitness, trunk skinfolds remained significantly (P < .05) related to insulin (r = .35), HDL-C (r = -.40), TC/HDL-C (r = .43), and apo AI (r = -.39). In conclusion, this study suggests that subcutaneous truncal fat, as estimated by skinfolds, is an independent predictor of CVD risk factors, and that the association between cardiovascular fitness and these risk factors may be mediated by the levels of abdominal subcutaneous fat in Caucasian middle-aged men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Human Movement, Technical University of Lisbon, Portugal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11092497

Citation

Sardinha, L B., et al. "Subcutaneous Central Fat Is Associated With Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Men Independently of Total Fatness and Fitness." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 49, no. 11, 2000, pp. 1379-85.
Sardinha LB, Teixeira PJ, Guedes DP, et al. Subcutaneous central fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors in men independently of total fatness and fitness. Metab Clin Exp. 2000;49(11):1379-85.
Sardinha, L. B., Teixeira, P. J., Guedes, D. P., Going, S. B., & Lohman, T. G. (2000). Subcutaneous central fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors in men independently of total fatness and fitness. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 49(11), 1379-85.
Sardinha LB, et al. Subcutaneous Central Fat Is Associated With Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Men Independently of Total Fatness and Fitness. Metab Clin Exp. 2000;49(11):1379-85. PubMed PMID: 11092497.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Subcutaneous central fat is associated with cardiovascular risk factors in men independently of total fatness and fitness. AU - Sardinha,L B, AU - Teixeira,P J, AU - Guedes,D P, AU - Going,S B, AU - Lohman,T G, PY - 2000/11/25/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/11/25/entrez SP - 1379 EP - 85 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metab. Clin. Exp. VL - 49 IS - 11 N2 - The purpose of this study was to analyze the single and independent associations of whole body composition and fat distribution with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and fitness in middle-aged men. Sixty-two healthy Caucasian men (37.6 +/- 2.9 yr, 81.8 +/- 11.3 kg, 171.5 +/- 4.9 cm) participated in the study. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was used to assess total and regional body composition. The triceps, biceps, midthigh, calf, subscapular, chest, abdominal and suprailiac skinfolds, and the waist, hip and midthigh circumferences, and sagittal diameter were estimated. Cardiovascular fitness was estimated with a submaximal test. Bivariate and partial correlation analysis were used to study the association of total body percent fat (%fat), DXA trunk fat and trunk skinfolds (sum of subscapular, chest, abdominal, and suprailiac) and fitness with insulin, total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), TC/HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), apolipoprotein AI (apo AI), apolipoprotein B (apo B), lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], and diastolic and systolic blood pressure. All anthropometric and DXA body composition variables were significantly correlated with TC/HDL-C (from .26 to .50, P < .05). Similar relationships were found for insulin, HDL-C, and systolic blood pressure (r from .26 to .47, P < .05). Cardiovascular fitness was significantly (P < .05) associated with insulin (r = -.36), HDL-C (r = .27), TC/HDL (r = -.27), and with systolic blood pressure (r = -.37). After controlling for trunk skinfolds, none of the anthropometric and DXA body composition variables were correlated with any of the CVD risk factors. Similarly, when controlling for trunk skinfolds, cardiovascular fitness was not related to any of the metabolic variables. After adjusting for %fat, DXA trunk fat, and cardiovascular fitness, trunk skinfolds remained significantly (P < .05) related to insulin (r = .35), HDL-C (r = -.40), TC/HDL-C (r = .43), and apo AI (r = -.39). In conclusion, this study suggests that subcutaneous truncal fat, as estimated by skinfolds, is an independent predictor of CVD risk factors, and that the association between cardiovascular fitness and these risk factors may be mediated by the levels of abdominal subcutaneous fat in Caucasian middle-aged men. SN - 0026-0495 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11092497/Subcutaneous_central_fat_is_associated_with_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_men_independently_of_total_fatness_and_fitness_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(00)73708-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -