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High constant incidence in twins and other relatives of women with breast cancer.
Nat Genet 2000; 26(4):411-4NGen

Abstract

The incidence of breast cancer rises steeply between ages 25 and 50, and more slowly thereafter. In contrast, the incidence in the unaffected (contralateral) breast of women who have had breast cancer remains constant at about 0.7% per year for at least the next 20 years after diagnosis, irrespective of age at first diagnosis. The incidence in relatives of the patients seems to show a similar pattern. The incidence in a prospective study of monozygotic twins of patients was approximately constant at 1.3% per year (77 cases), again about 0.7% per breast. At ages older than a patient's age at diagnosis, her mother and sisters have an incidence of 0.3-0.4% per year. Above the index patient's age at diagnosis, the rate in relatives shows no temporal trend and is independent of the patient's age at diagnosis. A statistically simple explanation is that incidence in susceptible women increases to a high constant level by a predetermined age that varies between families, but this seems inconsistent with conventional models of carcinogenesis and susceptibility. The very high incidence in monozygotic twins of patients indicates that a high proportion, and perhaps the majority, of breast cancers arise in a susceptible minority of women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Section of Epidemiology, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey, UK. j.peto@icr.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11101836

Citation

Peto, J, and T M. Mack. "High Constant Incidence in Twins and Other Relatives of Women With Breast Cancer." Nature Genetics, vol. 26, no. 4, 2000, pp. 411-4.
Peto J, Mack TM. High constant incidence in twins and other relatives of women with breast cancer. Nat Genet. 2000;26(4):411-4.
Peto, J., & Mack, T. M. (2000). High constant incidence in twins and other relatives of women with breast cancer. Nature Genetics, 26(4), pp. 411-4.
Peto J, Mack TM. High Constant Incidence in Twins and Other Relatives of Women With Breast Cancer. Nat Genet. 2000;26(4):411-4. PubMed PMID: 11101836.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - High constant incidence in twins and other relatives of women with breast cancer. AU - Peto,J, AU - Mack,T M, PY - 2000/12/2/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/12/2/entrez SP - 411 EP - 4 JF - Nature genetics JO - Nat. Genet. VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - The incidence of breast cancer rises steeply between ages 25 and 50, and more slowly thereafter. In contrast, the incidence in the unaffected (contralateral) breast of women who have had breast cancer remains constant at about 0.7% per year for at least the next 20 years after diagnosis, irrespective of age at first diagnosis. The incidence in relatives of the patients seems to show a similar pattern. The incidence in a prospective study of monozygotic twins of patients was approximately constant at 1.3% per year (77 cases), again about 0.7% per breast. At ages older than a patient's age at diagnosis, her mother and sisters have an incidence of 0.3-0.4% per year. Above the index patient's age at diagnosis, the rate in relatives shows no temporal trend and is independent of the patient's age at diagnosis. A statistically simple explanation is that incidence in susceptible women increases to a high constant level by a predetermined age that varies between families, but this seems inconsistent with conventional models of carcinogenesis and susceptibility. The very high incidence in monozygotic twins of patients indicates that a high proportion, and perhaps the majority, of breast cancers arise in a susceptible minority of women. SN - 1061-4036 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11101836/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/82533 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -